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Full text of "The University of North Carolina One Hundred and Eighth Session, The Catalogue"

THE UNIVERSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 




ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH SESSION 



THE CATALOGUE 



1902-1903 



THE UNIVERSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 




ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH SESSION 



THE CATALOGUE 



1902-1903 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 
CHAPEL HILL 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 
CHAPEL HILL 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Calendar 6 

The University 7—11 

Foundation and Government ... 7, 8 

Location . ■ 8,9 

Equipment 9, 10 

College Year 10 

Degrees 10 

Graduate Students 10 

Physical Culture 10, 11 

General Culture 11 

Religious Culture 11 

Discipline • 11 

Medical Attendance ■ 11 

Trustees 12-14 

Officers and Members of the Board 12-14 

Standing Committees 14 

Faculty and Other Officers 15-20 

Professors, Instructors, Assistants and Officers 15-20 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 20-22 

The College 23-71 

Requirements for Admission 23-27 

Admission into the Freshman Class 23-26 

Admission to Advanced Standing 26, 27 

Admission of Students not Candidates for a Degree 27 

Courses Leading to Degrees 28-31 

Courses for Students not Candidates for a Degree 31 

Courses of Instruction 82-53 

Graduate Students 54-56 

Degrees 54-56 

Admission of Women 56 

Pecuniary Aid and Expenses 57-62 

Medals and Prizes 57, 58 

Scholarships 58, 59 

Free Tuition 59, 60 

Loan Funds 60 

Expenses 60, 61 

Dormitory Accommodations 61, 62 

Regulations Regarding Students 63-71 

Registration and Assignment of Rooms 63 

Standing 63, 64 

Absences 64-66 

Examinations 66, 67 



4 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Athletic and Other Organizations 68 

Fraternities 68 

Graduation 68, 69 

Certificates 63 

Conduct 69 

Schedule of Recitations 70 

Schedule of Examinations 71 

The Law Department 72-76 

Faculty 72 

Courses of Instruction 72, 73 

Examinations 73, 74 

Special Lectures ■. . 74 

The Degree of LL.B 74 

Moot Court 74^75 

Expenses 75 

Admission and Registration 75 

Summer School 75, 76 

The Department of Medicine 77-90 

Faculty 77, 78 

Foundation 78, 79 

The Department at Chapel Hill 79-85 

The General Plan of Instruction 79, 80 

Courses of Instruction 80-84 

Entrance Requirements 84 

Pecuniary Aid 84, 85 

Expenses 85 

Admission and Registration 85 

The. Department at Raleigh 85-90 

Location and Facilities 85, 86 

Courses of Instruction 86-88 

The City Free Dispensary 89 

Degree 89 

Expenses 89 

Admission and Registration 89, 90 

The Department of Pharmacy 91-100 

Faculty 91 

Foundation 91, 92 

Arrangement of Courses 92, 93 

Courses of Instruction 93-96 

Examinations 97 

Quizzes 98 

The Pharmaceutical Laboratory 97, 98 

Other Laboratories ' 98 

Reading Room and Library 98 

Requirements for Graduation 98, 99 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Theses 99 

Prizes 99,100 

Expenses , 100 

Admission and Registration 100 

The School op Mining 101-105 

Faculty 101 

Courses of Instruction 101-104 

Laboratories 104 

Requirements for Admission 104 

Expenses 104-105 

Registration 105 

Students 106-127 

The College 106-118 

The Law Department 118-122 

The Department of Medicine '. 122-124 

The Department of Pharmacy 124-126 

Summary • 127 

The Summer School 128-139 

Faculty 128 

Announcement 128-130 

Courses of Instruction 130-136 

Expenses 137 

Students : 137-139 

The University Library 140-142 

The Gymnasium 143 

Laboratories and Museums 144-147 

The Physical Laboratory 144 

The Chemical Laboratory .- 144-146 

The Biological Laboratory 146 

The Geological Laboratory ■ 147 

The University Organizations 148-152 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 148 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 149 

The North Carolina Historical Society 149, 150 

The Shakspere Club 150 

The Philological Club 150, 151 

The Young Men's Christian Association 151, 152 

One Hundred and Seventh Commencement 152-156 

Speakers 153 

Degrees ' 154, 155 

Certificates 155, 156 

Medals and Prizes 156 

The Alumni Association 157 

Summary 158 

Index 159-161 



OALENDAE. 



1903. 

September 7-12. 
September 7, 8, 9. 



' 7,8 
September 10. 
September 12. 
October 1%. 
November 26. 



Monday to Saturday. Examination for the Re- 
moval of Conditions. 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. Examinations for 
Admission into the College. 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. Registration. 

Thursday. Lectures begin. 

Saturday. Assignment of Rooms . 

University Day. 

Thanksgiving Day. 



Christmas. Recess from December 22, 1903, to January 2, 1904. 



1904. 

January 2, 4, S. 
January 5. 
January 6. 
February 22. . 
May 29. 
May 31. 

May 31. 

May SI. 

May 31. 

June 1. 

June 1. 

Summer Vacation 



Saturday, Monday, Tuesday. Registration. 
Tuesday. Lectures begin. 
Wednesday. Assignment of Rooms. 
Washington's Birthday. 
Sunday. Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Tuesday. Debate by Representatives from the Dia- 
lectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies. 
Tuesday. Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday. The Address to the Alumni. 
Tuesday. Senior Class Day. 
Wednesday. Senior Speaking. 
Wednesday. Commencement, 
from Commencement to the Second Thursday in Sep- 
tember. 



THE UNIVEESITY. 



.Foundation and Government. The University was established in 
obedience to the first Constitution of the State, which was adopted in De- 
cember, 177*). A clause of Section XLI declared that "all useful learning 
shall be duly encouraged, and promoted in one or more universities." The 
Charter was granted by the General Assembly in 1789, the corner stone of 
the_ Old East Building was laid in 1793 and the University was opened in 
1795. 

The title, preamble and first section of the Act of incorporation are as 
follows: 

An Act to establish a University in this State. 

"Whereas in all well regulated Governments, it is the indispensable 
Duty of every Legislature to consult the Happiness of a rising Generation, 
and endeavor to fit them for an honourable Discharge of the social Duties 
of Life, by paying the strictest Attention to their Education: And where- 
as an University supported by permanent Funds, and well endowed, would 
have the most direct Tendency to answer the above Purpose: 

"I. Beit therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North- 
Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the Authority of the Same, That Samuel 
Johnston, James Iredell, Charles Johnson, Hugh Williamson, Stephen Cabar- 
rus, Richard. Dobbs Spaight, William Blount, Benjamin Williams, John 
Sitgreaves, Frederick Hargett, Robert Snead, Archibald Madame, Honourable 
Samuel Ashe, Robert Dixon, Benjamin Smith, Honourable Samuel Spencer, 
John Hay, James Hogg, Henry William Harrington, William Barry Grove, 
Reverend Samuel M'Corkle, Adlai Osborne, John Stokes, John Hamilton, 
Joseph Graham, Honourable John Williams, Thomas Person, Alfred. Moore, 
Alexander Mebane, Joel Lane, Willie. Jones, Benjamin Hawkins, John Hay- 
wood, senior, John Macon, William Richardson Davie, Joseph Dixon, Wil- 
liam Lenoir, Joseph M'Dowell, James Holland and William Porter, Esquires, 
shall be and they are hereby declared to be a Body politic and corporate to 
be known and distinguished by the name of The Trustees of the University 



8 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

of North Carolina;* and by that name shall have perpetual Succession and 
a common Seal; and that they the Trustees and their Successors, by the 
Name aforesaid, or a Majority of them, shall be able and capable in Law 
to take, demand, receive and possess all Monies, Goods and Chattels that 
shall be given them for the Use of the said University, and the same ap- 
ply according to the Will of the Donors, and by Gift, Purchase or Devise to 
take, have, receive, possess, enjoy and retain to them and their Successors 
forever, any Lands, Rents, Tenements and Hereditaments, of what Kind, 
Nature or Quality soever the same may be, in special Trust and Confidence 
that the same or Profits thereof shall be applied to and for the Use and 
Purpose of establishing and endowing the said University, "t 

The University is governed by a board of trustees elected by the Legis- 
lature, and is free from sectional, sectarian, or political control. The Gov- 
ernor of the State is ex-officio President of the Board of Trustees. 

Article IX of the Constitution of 1876 contains the following provisions 
regarding the University:— 

"Sec. 6. The General Assembly shall have power to providefor the elec- 
tion of Trustees of the University of North Carolina, in whom, when chosen, 
shall be vested all the privileges, rights, franchises and endowments there- 
of, in anywise granted to or conferred upon the Trustees of said Universi- 
ty; and the General Assembly may make such provisions, laws and regu- 
lations from time to time as may be necessary and expedient for the main- 
tenance and management of said University. 

"Sec. 7. The General Assembly shall provide that the benefits of the 
University, as far as practicable, be extended to the youth of the State free 
of expense for tuition; also that all the property which has heretofore ac- 
crued to the State, or shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed divi- 
dends, or distributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, shall be 
appropriated to the use of the University." 

Location. The seat of the University is Chapel Hill, Orange county, 
twenty-eight miles northwest of Raleigh. Two daily passenger trains run 
between Chapel Hill and University Junction, a station on the North Caro- 
lina Railroad. The site for the institution was selected because of its 
healthfulness, its freedom from malaria, its supply of pure water, its beau- 
tiful scenery and its central position in the State. 

*The corporate name has been changed to The University of North Carolina. 

tLaws of the State of North Carolina, published by James Iredell, Edenton, MDCCXCI. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 9 

Equipment. The University campus contains forty-eight acres of land, 
affording ample grounds for buildings and for all sorts of athletic sports. 
The University owns, contiguous to the campus, five hundred acres of 
forest land, which is partly laid off into walks and drives. The Universi- 
ty has sixteen buildings. 

The South Building contains two lecture rooms and thirty dormitories. 

The Old East Building contains two lectures rooms and twenty-eight 
dormitories. 

The Old West Building contains two lecture rooms, the Historical Museum 
and twenty seven dormitories. 

Person Hall contains the Chemical Laboratory and Museum and a lect- 
ure room. 

Gerrard Hall is used for morning prayers, for the meetings of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and for public lectures. 

Smith Hall contains the College Library and the reading rooms. 

The Neii' West Buildiug contains the Dialectic Literary Society's Hall, 
the Pharmaceutical Laboratory, two lecture rooms and nine dormitories. 

The New East Building contains the Philanthropic Literary Society's 
Hall, the Biological Laboratory and Musem, the Geological Laboratory 
and Museum, the Physiological Laboratory, the offices of the North Caro- 
lina Geological Survey and three lecture rooms. 

Memorial Hall commemorates the illustrious dead of the University. It 
is used during the session as a gymnasium, and at Commencement for pub- 
lic exercises. 

The Alumni Hall contains the offices of administration, the Physical Lab- 
oratory and ten lecture rooms. 

The Can- Building, the gift of Gen. J. S. Carr, contains forty two dormi- 
tories fitted with every modern convenience. 

The Mary Ann Smith Building contains forty dormitories of the most 
modern type. 

The Dissecting Hall, for the use of the Medical School, is apart from the 
other buildings. 

The Infirmary contains five rooms which are properly furnished for the 
care and treatment of the sick. 

Commons is the dining hall of the University. The whole enterprise 
was made possible through the beneficence of Mrs. Frederick Baker, of New 



10 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

I York. Board is furnished at eight dollars a month. Students wait upon 
the tables. 

The Power House contains the electric lighting plant, the central heating 
plant, filter and pumps of the system of water supply, and the rooms of 
the University Press. 

The general equipment has been improved by a thorough system of sew- 
ers and baths, a supply of pure water in all buildings, and hot water heat in 
all the offices, recitation rooms and dormitories. 

College Year. The College year begins on the second Thursday in 
September. Commencement is held on Wednesday before the first Thurs- 
day in June. The Summer vacation begins at Commencement, and ends 
on the Wednesday before the second Thursday in September. There is a 
Christmas recess of about ten days. The twelfth of October (University 
Day), Thanksgiving Day, and the twenty-second of February (Washing- 
ton's Birthday) are holidays. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Philosophy, Bach- 
elor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, 
Doctorof Medicine, Bachelor of Laws and Graduate in Pharmacy are con- 
ferred by the vote of the Trustees, after the recommendation of the Facul- 
ty, upon candidates who have satisfied the requirements of residence and 
study at the University. Students who are not candidates for a degree may 
elect any studies they wish, devoting their time entirely to one or two 
subjects, or selecting groups of such subjects as suit then- tastes and purposes. 

Graduate Students. Free instruction is offered in the College to grad- 
uates of colleges and universities. Women are admitted to the high- 
er courses of the University. 

Physical Culture. Hearty encouragement is given to athletic sports 
and to all kinds of physical culture. The athletic field furnishes a ruple 
facilities for football and baseball. The Lake Track is admirably adapted 
for running, bicycling and general track athletics. Fifteen tennis courts 
are located on the campus. Systematic exercise in Memorial Hall under a 
skilled instructor is required of all students in the College, except Seniors. 

General Culture. The University endeavors to furnish such general 
culture outside the lecture rooms and laboratories as will broaden the 
minds and sympathies of young men. 

Beligious Culture. Prayers are conducted in Gerrard Hall, with the 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 11 

reading of the scriptures and singing, every weekday morning except Satur - 
day,at 8:30 o'clock. Attendance at this service is required of all members of 
the College, unless specially excused. Bible classes for young men are taught 
in each of the four churches of the village every Sunday. Religious exer- 
cises are held twice a week, or oftener in each church. A series of ser- 
mons is delivered annually by the University Preachers, chosen by the 
Trustees from the various denominations. Bible lectures are delivered 
every Sunday morning in Gerrard Hall. The Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation meets three times a week, in Gerrard Hall, for prayer and other 
services and conducts a series of Bible courses, which are numerously at- 
tended by the students. 

Discipline. The University endeavors to make young men manly and 
self-reliant, and to develop character by educating the conscience. The 
Faculty may, at their discretion, admonish, suspend or dismiss students 
for neglect of duty or for misconduct. 

Medical Attendance. On the payment of a small annual fee, each 
student receives the careful attention of the University Physician. In 
this way the best medical advice is to be had at the least cost. 



TRUSTEES. 



CHARLES BRANTLEY AYOOOK, Governor, President ex officio of the 

Board of Trustees. 
RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, Secretary and Treasurer. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



1905.* 

BEN FRANKLIN DIXON, 
CLAUDIUS DOCKERY, 
RUFUS ALEXANDER DOUGHTON, 
ALEXANDER H. GALLOWAY, 
HIRAM L. GRANT, 
STEPHEN PORTER GRAVES, 
ROBERT TERELIUS GRAY, 
OWEN H. GUION, 
FRANCIS W. HANCOCK, 
JAMES ALLEN HOLT, 
WILLIAM RAND KENAN, 
VIRGIL STUART LUSK, 
BENJAMIN SIDNEY MITCHELL, 
NATHAN ALEXANDER RAMSEY, 
THOMAS SCOTT ROLLINS, 
ALFRED MOORE SCALES, 
FRANK SHEPHERD SPRUILL, 
DAVID ALEXANDER WHITE, 



Cleveland. 

Richmond. 

Alleghany. 

Rockingham. 

Wayne. 

Surry. 

Wake. 

Craven. 

Granville. 

Guilford. 

New Hanover. 

Buncombe. 

Franklin. 

Durham. 

Madison. 

Guilford. 

Franklin. 

Alamance. 



1907. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Orange. 

* The legal term of office expires November 30 of the year indicated. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



13 



fabius haywood busbee, 
bennehan cameron, 
charles m. cooke, 
john william fries, 
Robert Mcknight furman, 
william anderson guthrie, 
edward joseph hale, 
daniel e. hudgins, 
thomas stephen kenan, 
richard henry lewis, 
james alexander lockhart, 
james smith manning 
james dixon murphy, 
gilbert brown patterson, 
jesse lindsay patterson, 
frederick philips, 
charles manly stedman, 
henry weil, 
william thornton whitsett, 



Wake. 

Durham. 

Franklin. 

Forsyth. 

Wake. 

Durham. 

Cumberland. 

McDowell. 

Wake. 

Wake. 

Anson. 

Durham. 

Buncombe. 

Robeson. 

Forsyth. 

Edgecombe. 

Guilford. 

Wayne. 

Guilford. 



1909. 

ALEXANDER BOYD ANDREWS, Wake. 

RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, Wake. 

JULIAN SHAKESPEARE CARR, Durham. 

JOSEPHUS DANIELS, Wake. 

WILLIAM HENRY DAY, Wake. 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON GRAHAM, Granville. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS HAYWOOD, Alamance. 

JULIUS JOHNSON, Caswell. 

HENRY ARMAND LONDON, Chatham. 

DAN HUGH McLEAN, Harnett. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS MASON, Northampton. 

PAUL BARRINGER MEANS, Cabarrus. 

LEE SLATER OVERMAN, Rowan. 

JAMES PARKER, Gates. 

LOUIS JULIEN PICOT, Warren. 

WILLIAM D. PRUDEN, Chowan. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



JAMES SPRUNT, 
GEORGE GULLETT STEPHENS, 
PLATT DICKINSON WALKER, 
JAMES WILLIAM WILSON, 

1911. 

EUGENE MOREHEAD ARMFIELD, 

JAMES OSCAR ATKINSON, 

CHRISTOPHER THOMAS BAILEY, 

VICTOR SILAS BRYANT, 

WILLIAM HYSLOP SUMNER BURGWYN, 

PERRIN BUSBEE, 

FREDERICK LOUIS CARR, 

RICHARD BENBURY CREECY, 

JOHN WASHINGTON GRAHAM, 

MARMADUKE J. HAWKINS, 

FERNANDO GODFREY JAMES, 

THOMAS JEFFERSON JEROME, 

ROBERT A. JOHNSTON, 

CHARLES McNAMEE, 

LEE T. MANN, 

WALTER MURPHY, 

GEORGE ROUNTREE, 

ZEBULON BAIRD WALSER, 

FRANCIS DONNELL WINSTON, 

CHARLES WILLIAM WORTH, 



New Hanover. 
Mecklenburg. 
Mecklenburg. 
Burke. 



Guilford. 

Alamance. 

Wake. 

Durham. 

Halifax. 

Wake. 

Greene. 

Pasquotank. 

Orange. 

Warren. 

Pitt. 

Union. 

Richmond. 

Buncombe. 

Gaston. 

Rowan. 

New Hanover. 

Davidson. 

Bertie. 

New Hanover. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Executive Committee. 

Governor Charles Brantley Aycock, Chairman. 
Alexander B. Andrews, John W. Graham, 

Richabd H. Battle, Thomas S. Kenan, 

Fabius H. Busbee, Richard H. Lewis, 

Julian S. Carr, Frederick Philips, 

Zebulon B. Walser. 

Committee of Visitation. 

Rufus Alexander Doughton, Chairman. 
James Smith Manning, ' Thomas Williams 'Mason. 



FACULTY AND OTHER OFFICERS. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLB, Ph.D., 

PRESIDENT, 
Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., 

Alumni Professor of History. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B., 
State Geologist, Lecturer on the Geology of North Carolina. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, O.E., 

Dean of the School of Mining, 

Professor of Physics. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D., 

Professor of English Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., 
Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literatures. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Dean of the Faculty, 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.E., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., 

Dean of the Medical Department at Chapel Hill, 

Professor of Anatomy and Pathology. 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS, A.M., B.D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

*HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., 
Professor of Biology. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., 

Prof essor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., 
Professor of Materia Mediea and Instructor in Anatomy. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., 

Dean of the Department of Pharmacy, 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

tHENRY FARRAR LINSCOTT, Ph.D., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, LL.D., 
Dean of the Department of Law, 

Professor of Law. , 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., 

Smith Professor of General and Industrial Chemistry- 

ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., 
Professor of Physiology and Instructor in Bacteriology. 

CHARLES ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., 
Professor of the English Language. 

HUBERT ASHLEY ROYSTER, A.B., M.D., 

Dean of the Medical Department at Raleigh, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON KNOX, M.D., 

Professor of Surgery. 

* Absent on leave, in Berlin, 1902-3 ; engaged in scientific work for the United States 
Government. 

t Died, Dec. 30, 1902. 



THE CATALOGUE 17 

WISCONSIN ILLINOIS ROYSTER, M.D., 

Professor of the Practice of Medicine. 

RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, A.B., M.D., 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Jr., A.B., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

JAMES EDWIN DUERDEN, Ph.D., A.R.C.S. (Lond.), 
Acting Professor of Biology. 

THOMAS RUFFIN, D.C.L., 

Associate Professor of Law. 

ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

CHARLES LEE RAPER, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Economics and of History. 

JAMES DOWDEN BRUNER, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of the Romanic. Languages and Literatures. 

WILLIAM CHAMBERS COKER, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Botany. 

*ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

THOMAS JAMES WILSON, Jr., Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Latin. 

GEORGE McFARLAND McKIE, 

Instructor in Expression and in English. 

fEDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM, Ph.B., 

Instructor in English. 

t J AMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., 

Instructor in Physics. 

♦Absent on leave, 1902-3; Fellow, University of Chicago. 

t Absent on leave, 1902-3 ^graduate student, Columbia University. 

J Absent on leave, 1902-3 ; graduate student, Harvard University. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., 
Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

CLARENCE ALBERT SHORE, S.M., 
Instructor in Biology. 

WILLIAM STANLY BERNARD, A.B., 

Instructor in Greek. 

MARVIN HENDRIX STACY, Ph.B., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

EDWARD von den STEINEN, 
Instructor in Physical Culture. 

ANDREW WATSON GOODWIN, M.D., 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

HENRY McKEE TUCKER, M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. 

JAMES WILLIAM McGEE, Jr., M.D.; 

Chief of Dispensary. 

ROBERT SHERWOOD McGEACHY, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant in Surgery and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM DeBERNIERE MacNDDER, 
Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

WILLIAM MONCURE, Jr., M.D., 

Assistant in Dispensary. 

WILLIE CALVIN RANKIN, 

Assistant in German. 

*LOUIS GRAVES, A.B., 

Assistant in French. 

tWILLIAM JONES GORDON, 

Assistant in French. 

* Fall Term, 
t Spring Term. 



THE CATALOGUE 19 

• *ZEBULON VANCE JUDD, 
Assistant in French. 

JOHN CHRISTOPH BUTCHER EHRINGHAUS, A.B., 

Assistant in English. 

BARTHOLOMEW FULLER HUSKE, 

Assistant in English. 

GEORGE PHIFER STEVENS, A.B., 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

RICHARD HENRY McFADYEN, 

Assistant in Physics. 

PRANK LEE FOUST, 

Assistant in Physics. 

ROYALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.B., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

^HUGH HAMMOND BENNETT, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

HAZEL HOLLAND, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

IVEY FOREMAN LEWIS, A.B., 
Assistant in Biology. 

FRED MOIR HANES, 

Assistant in Biology. 

ROBERT GILLIAM LASSITER, 

Assistant in Geology. 

ROBERT ARTHUR LICHTENTHAELER, S.B., 

Assistant in Geology. 

WILLIAM MORGAN PERRY, 

Assistant in Pharmacy. 



* Spring Term. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

MARSHALL CRAPON GUTHRIE, Jr. 

Assistant in Anatomy. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D.,LL.D., 

Supervisor of the Library. 

LOUIS ROUND WILSON, A.M., 

Librarian. 

GEORGE LYLE JONES, 

ERNEST LINWOOD SAWYER, 

FREDERICK CHARLES ARCHER, 

SIDNEY SWAIM ROBINS, 

Assistants in the Library. 

WILLIE THOMAS PATTERSON, 
Bursar. 

CHARLES THOMAS WOOLLEN, 

Registrar. 

JOHN FRANK PICKARD, 

Superintendent of Buildings. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY. 

The President is a member, ex officio, of all committees. 

On the Curriculum 
Professors Gore, H. V. Wilson, Battle, Alexander, Hume and Noble. 



THE CATALOGUE 21 

On Auditing 
Professors Toy and Cain. 

On. Athletics 
President Venable, Professors Baskerville and Manqum. l ^~ 

On Catalogue 
Professors Toy, Gore and Alexander. 

On Commons 
Professors Toy, WrLLtAMS and Mr. McKie. 

On the Library 
Professors Alexander, Raper and Smith. 

On the Publication, of the Record 
Professors Alexander and Linscott. 

On the Professional Schools 
Professors MacR\e, Whitehead and Howell. 

On Substitutions and Petitions 
Professors Gore, Linscott and Alexander. 

On the University Magazine 
Professors Cobb, Hume and Baskerville. 

On the Young Hen's Christian Association 
Professors Hume, Wheeler, Bruner and Mr. McKie, 



22 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

On Public Lectures 
Professors Baskervtlle, Alexander and Mr. McKie. 

On Debates 
Professors Hume, Williams, Raper and Smith. 

On Self Help 
Professors Toy, Wheeler and T. J. Wilson, Jr. 

On the University Press 
Professors Linscott and Toy. 



THE COLLEGE. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Admission into the Freshman Class. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are received by exam- 
ination or by certificate. Entrance examinations are held in September 
(see page 26) . Students who present certificates of work accomplished at 
preparatory schools or colleges, may be admitted without examination, 
provided that the certificates are approved. The right to examine, how- 
ever, is reserved, when such a course is deemed necessary. 

Certificates must be made out on the printed forms furnished on appli- 
cation to the Registrar, and must be deposited with that officer, properly 
approved, before the work can be officially credited. 

Subjects Accepted for Entrance. 

Eight subjects may be offered for entrance to the University. Appli- 
cants for admission to courses leading to degrees are required to be pre- 
pared in five of these subjects. The selection of these will depend upon 
the course of study to be, pursued after admission. 

The requirements in each of these eight subjects are as follows: — 

1. Gkeek. Three books of Xenophon's Anabasis, with questions on the 
more usual forms and constructions; simple narrative in English, based 
upon Xenophon's Anabasis, to be translated into Greek. 

2. Latin. Two books of Caesar's Gallic War; four orations of Cicero; 
six books of Vergil's Aeneid; Latin Grammar, including prosody; simple 
narrative in English, based upon the prose read, to be translated into 
Latin. 

3. English. Grammar. Elements of Rhetoric. Every candidate is 
required to write a short composition, correct in spelling, punctuation, 



24 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

. grammar, and division into paragraphs, upon one of several subjects an- 
nounced at the time of the examination. 

The candidate is expected to read all the books named below, and to give 
evidence in his composition that he is acquainted with the important parts 
of the book from which the subject of his composition is taken, and with 
the life of the author. 

The entrance examinations in 1903 and 1904 will be based upon the fol- 
lowing books: — 

For reading and practice: Burke's Speech on Conciliation with Amer- 
ica, Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison, Milton's L' Allegro, II Pen- 
seroso, Comus and Lycidas, Shakespeare's Macbeth. 

For class study and practice: The De Coverly Papers. Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns, Coleridge's Ancient Mariner, George Eliot's Silas Marner, Gold- 
smith's Vicar of Wakefield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar 
and The Merchant of Venice, Tennyson's The Princess. 

4. History. Either of the following courses: 

a. The histories of the United States, Greece and Rome as outlined in 
the best text books for high schools. 

h . The histories of the United States and England as outlined in the 
best text books for high schools. 

5. Mathematics. A good working knowledge of Arithmetic, including 
fundamental operations (particularly on common and decimal fractions), 
compound numbers, percentage, interest and extraction of square root. 
Problems that are much more easily solved by algebra are not included 
here. The whole of a high school algebra and a college algebra to quad- 
ratics. The first three books of Plane Geometry. 

6. German. A thorough knowledge of the inflections, including the 
most common strong verbs; acquaintance with the ordinary laws of Ger- 
man syntax; such facility in translation as is gained by a careful study of 
at least 150 duodecimo pages of ordinary modern German prose; ability to 
translate into German simple sentences based on the passage assigned for 
examination; accurate pronunciation. 

7. French. Similar to the requirements stated for German, save that 
the applicant should have read at least 200 duodecimo pages of ordinary- 
modern French prose. 



THE CATALOGUE 25 

It is recommended that the preparation for the entrance requirements 
in German and French be extended over two full school years, with four 
recitation periods per week, so as to allow time for short lessons with dic- 
tation exercises, oral practice and frequent reviews. 

8. Physics. The whole of an elementary course such as is contained 
in Gage's Principles of Physics or its equivalent, embracing the work of at 
least one session of nine months. 



Grouping of Subjects. 

i 

All candidates for admission to the Freshman Class must offer prepara- 
tion in Mathematics, in English and in History. Two additional subjects 
must then be offered. The choice of subjects will depend upon the course 
of study to be followed. These subjects are: — 

1 . For the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the requirement in Greek and 
the requirement in Latin. 

2. For the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, the requirement in Greek 
or in Latin and the requirement in German or in French or in Physics. 

3. For the degree of Bachelor of Science, the requirement in German 
or in French and the requirement in Physics. 

When applicants have had no preparation in Physics or in German or in 
French, the requirement may be satisfied by pursuing the corresponding 
courses in College. But these studies must be taken in addition to the re- 
quirements for the degree. 

Examinations. 

All candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in any course lead- 
ing to a degree must assemble in Gerrard Hall at 9 a. m. Monday, September 
7, 190S, for preliminary registration. They will there be assigned to rooms 
for examination- 



26 the university bulletins 

Order op Examinations. 

Monday, September 7. 
10 a M.-l p. m. Latin. 3-5 p. m. History. 

Tuesday, September S. 
10 a. M.-l p. m. Mathematics. 3-5 p. m. English. 

Wednesday, September 9. 
10 a. m.-1 p. m. Greek and Physics. 3-5 P. m. French and German. 

Arrangements have been made with certain schools in the state where- 
by ex amin ations for admission may be held in May also, at the schools. 

A student who fails to pass in any subject required for admission will 
be conditioned in that subject. Such conditions must be removed before 
the beginning of the Sophomore year. He will receive no final mark in 
the department in which such condition occurs until the condition is re- 
moved. Nor will he be admitted to the work of the Sophomore year in 
any department until all entrance conditions are removed. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

A candidate for advanced standing may be admitted to the Sophomore, 
Junior or Senior class, with or without complete examination. He is sub- 
ject not only to the examinations required of candidates for admission into 
the Freshman Class, but to special examinations both in all the required 
studies already pursued by the class which he desires to enter, and in as 
many elective studies as would have been required of him as a member of 
that class. When satisfied with the apparent fitness of the candidate, the 
examining committee may, in spite of his deficiencies in some studies, 
admit him to an advanced class; but a candidate so admitted is not recom- 
mended for a degree until his deficiencies are made good. The examining 
committee may accept also, with proper restrictions, the official report of 
work satisfactorily completed at a college or university of good standing, 
in place of an examination upon such previous work. 



THE CATALOGUE 2? 

A candidate for advanced standing should present himself for examina- 
tion on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for admis- 
sion into the Freshman Class. 

Admission of Students not Candidates for a Degree. 

A student who desires to pursue a course of study, without becoming 
a candidate for a degree, may be admitted into the College upon the pre- 
sentation of a certificate from the college or university last attended, or by 
passing satisfactory examinations on at least three subjects required for 
entrance. English must be one of the subjects offered. A candidate so 
admitted enjoys the same privileges with other members of the College, 
and is subject to the same regulations. 



COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES. 



The College prescribes three courses of study, of four years each, leading 
respectively to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), Bachelor of Philos- 
ophy (Ph.B.), and Bachelor of Science (S.B.). In order to be recommended 
for any Bachelor's degree, the student must have passed satisfactory ex- 
aminations in all the studies required for that degree and in a number of 
elective courses sufficient to make the aggregate work of four years amount 
to an average of fifteen hours of lecture or recitation per week for each 
year. Duly approved certificates of work accomplished at other colleges or 
universities, will be credited without examination. The courses are as fol- 
lows: — 

I. BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: Greek 1(4)*; Latin 1(4); English 1(3); Mathe- 
matics 1(4). 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2(3); Mathematics 2(3); one study from 
the following group: Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3) ; one study from the following 
group: Chemistry 1(3), Physics 1(3); one study from the following group: 
Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3), German 1(3), French 1(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: One study from the following group: Philosophy 
1(3), Economics 1(2), History 5(3); one study from the following group: 
Greek, Latin, German, French. 

* Numerals in parenthesis indicate number of hours per week in each study. 



THE CATALOGUE 29 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen in any course leading to a degree. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: Each graduate must have completed before gradu- 
ation at least nine hours of connected work in one department. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen and Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 

II. BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: English 1(3); Mathematics 1(4); History 1(3); one 
study from the following group: Greek 1(4), Latin 1(4); one study from 
the following group: German 1 or 2(3), French 1 or 3(3). 

Those who offer neither a Modern Language nor Elementary 
Physics at entrance, must take one of these subjects in addition to 
the requirements for graduation. 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2(3) ; Mathematics 2(3) ; one study from the 
following group: Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3); one study from the following 
group: German 1 or 2(3), French 1 or 2(3); one study from the following 
group: Chemistry 1(3), Physics 1(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: One study from the following group: Philosophy 
1(3), Economics 1(2), History 5(3); one study from the following group: 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geology. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen in any course leading to a degree. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: Each graduate niust have completed before gradu- 
ation at least nine hours of connected work in one department. 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen and Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 

III. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: English 1(3) ; Mathematics 1(4) ; Geology 1(3) ; His- 
tory 1(3); one study from the following group: German 1 or 2(3), French 1 
or 2(3). 

Those who do not offer a Modern Language and Elementary 
Physics at entrance, must take both of these subjects in the Fresh- 
man year, in addition to the requirements for graduation. Geol- 
ogy 1 may, if necessary, be postponed until a subsequent year. 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies: English 2(3); Mathematics 2(3); Chemistry 1(3); 
Physics 1(3); one study from the following group: German 1 or 2(3), 
French 1 or 2(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: One study from the following group: Philosophy 
1(3), Economics 1(2), History 5(3); one study from the following group: 
Biology 1(5), Geology 3(3). 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen in any course leading to a degree. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies: Each graduate must have completed before gradu- 
ation at least nine hours of connected work in one department. 



THE CATALOGUE 31 

Elective Studies: Any studies in the College except those required of 
Freshmen and Sophomores in any course leading to a degree. 

COURSES FOR STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE. 

Elective courses of study may be selected by students who are unable to 
complete any of the three courses leading to a degree. Students intending 
to pursue these elective courses must prove their qualifications according to 
the regulations on page 27. After satisfying these entrance requirements, 
they may elect such studies as they are qualified to pursue. These elective 
courses may be so arranged as to include studies preparatory to teaching or 
to the study of law or medicine. 

For students intending to teach, the following course has been arranged: 

First Year: English 1, Mathematics 1, History 1, Pedagogy 1, 3 and 5; 
one study from the following group: Latin 1, Greek 1, French 1, German 1. 

Second Year: English 2, Physics 1 or Chemistry 1, Pedagogy 2, 4 and 

6. Electives amounting to a total of six hours from the following group: 

German, French, Greek, Latin, Mathematics, Geology, Physiology, 

History. 
3 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



GREEK. 



Eben Alexander, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the Greek Language and 

Literature. 
William Stanly Bernard, A.B., Instructor in Greek. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Alexander and Mr. Bernard. 

1. Homer's Iliad, books I., II. and III. Review of important grammatical 

principles. Lysias, selected speeches. Reading at sight. Four 

hours a week. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Elective with Latin 1 as a requirement of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Plato, Apology and Orito. Aristophanes, Clouds. Euripides, Iphi- 

genia among the Taurians. Reading at sight. Lectures on Greek 

literature. Three hours a week. 

Elective with Latin 2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

3. Prose Composition, elementary course. Qne hour a week. 

Intended as supplementary to Greek 1. 

Primarily for Undergraduates. 

Professor Alexander. 

4. Lectures on old Greek Life. History of Greek Art, text-book and lec- 

tures. Two hours a week. 

5. Modern Greek. Rangabe's Handbook. Bikelas's Stories. News- 

papers. Two hours aweek (spring term). 



THE CATALOGUE 33 

6. Honier, rapid reading of the entire Odyssey. Two hours a week. 

9. Demosthenes, three Philippics. Two hours a week (spring term). 

For Graduates and Specially Qualified Undergraduates. 

7. Greek Drama: Euripides, Medea; Sophocles, CEdipus Tyrannus; JEs- 

chylus, Prometheus Bound; Aristophanes, Frogs; Aristotle, Poet- 
ics. Three hours a week. 

8. Prose Composition, advanced course. Two hours a week (fall term). 

10. Plato, Phaedo. Two hours a week (fall term). 

11. Greek History: the selections from Greek Historians in parts I. and 

II. of Baumeister's Quellenbvch zar Alien Geschichte. Two liours a 
week ( spring term) . 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3, and four hours of elective work. 

LATIN. 

Henry Fakrar Linscott, Ph.D., Professor of the Latin Language and 

Literature. 
Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor. Linscott and Associate Professor Wilson. 

1. Cicero, de Senectute and de Amicitia. Livy, Book XXI. Horace, the 

Odes and Epodes. Pour hours a week. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Elective with Greek 1 as a requirement of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Horace, Satires and Epistles. Plautus, Captivi; Terence, Phormio; 

Tacitus, Agricola and Germania. The history of Roman litera- 
ture. Three hours a week. 



34 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

Elective with Greek 2 as a requirement of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Associate Professor Wilson. 

3. Prose Composition. Translation from English into Latin. One hour 

a week. 

Intended as supplementary to Latin 1. Open to students who are 
taking Latin 1 or 2. 

Professor Linscott. 

7. Roman Private Life. Lectures and illustration by photographs and 

stereopticon. Tiro hours a week (fall term). 

Open to Juniors and Seniors, and to Sophomores who are taking 
Latin 2. 

8. Roman Civilization: its character and elements. Provincial adminis- 

tration and Roman influence in the provinces. Lectures. Two 

hours a week (spring term) . 
Elective under the same conditions as Latin 7. 



For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. Catullus, selected poems. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura. Tiro hours a 

week. 
To be omitted in 1903-1904. 

5. Pliny, selected Letters. Juvenal, Satires. Martial, selected Epigrams. 

Two hours a meek. 

Associate Professor Wilson. 

6. Cicero. The philosophical works (de Officiis and Tusculan Disputa- 

tions). The rhetorical works (Brutus and de Oratore). Two hours 
a week. 
To be omitted in 1903-1904. 

9. The Elegiac Poets of the Augustan Age, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid. 

The history of Elegiac poetry. Two hours a week. 

Professor Linscott. 

10. A course for teachers. Pronunciation. Prosody. The art of reading 

Latin. A classification of the moods and tenses. Two hours a 
week. 



THE CATALOGUE 35 

Por Graduates. 

11. The study of a particular author or period in Roman literature. Wide 

reading and written reports. Two hours a week. 

Associate Professor Wilson. 

12. The Latin language. Phonology and Morphology or Syntax. Com- 

parative study. Two hours a week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 
courses 1 and 2 and five hours of elective work. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Walter Dallam Toy, M.A., Professor of the Germanic Languages and 

Literatures. 
Willie Calvin Rankin, Assistant in German. 



German. 
For Undergraduates. 

Professor Toy and Mr. Rankin. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Written exercises. Translation, 

sight reading, dictation. Three hoars a iveek. 

Required in the Freshman year of candidates for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science, who offer French at entrance. 

Elective in the Freshman year with French 1 or 2, as a requirement 
of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Elective in the Sophomore year with Greek 2, Latin 2, or French 1, 
as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Professor Toy. 

2. Advanced Course. Translation. Sight reading. Composition. Dic- 

tation. Grammar. Lectures on Literature. Three hours a week. 

Elective with French 1 or 2 in the Sophomore year, as a reqiiirement 
of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Open only to those who have completed course 1 or its equivalent. 



36 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

German Literature. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. History of German Literature. Lectures. Collateral reading. Themes. 

Three hours a week. 

A certificate is granted to students who have completed with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3. 

Germanic Philology. 

4. Middle High German. Three hours a week. 

5. Old High German. Three hours a week. 

6. Gothic. Three hours a week. 

Courses 4 and 6 will be omitted in 1903-04. 

ROMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

James Dowden Bruner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Romanic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 
Louis Graves, A.B., Assistant in French. 
William Jones Gordon, Assistant in French. 
Zebulon Vance Judd, Assistant in French. 

French. 

For Undergraduates. 

Associate Professor Bruner, Mr. Graves, Mr. Gordon and Mr. Judd. 
1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Written exercises. 
Rapid reading of easy prose. Reading at sight. Three hours a 
meek. 



THE CATALOGUE 37 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science who offer German at entrance. 

Elective in the Freshman year with German 1 or 2, as a requirement 
of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Elective in the Sophomore year with Greek 2, Latin 2 or German 1, 
as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Associate Professor Bkunbr. 

2. The History of French Literature in the Nineteenth Century. Rapid 

reading of representative novels and dramas. Collateral reading. 

TJi.ree hours a week. 

Elective with German 1 or 2, in the Sophomore year, as a require- 
ment of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Open only to candidates who have completed course 1. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. The History of French Literature in the Seventeenth Century. Rapid 

reading of representative dramas. Collateral reading. Three hours 
a week. 
Open to those who have completed courses 1 and 2. 

5. Old French Language and Literature, with special reference to the 
French element in English. Rapid reading of old French texts . 
Lectures on the history of French sounds and inflections. Tiro 
hours a week. 
Open only to those who have completed courses 2 or 3. 

A certificate is granted to those who have completed with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3 or 5. 

Spanish. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Associate Professor Brunee. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Written exercises. 
Rapid reading of prose. Reading at sight. Three'fioun a week. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

Italian. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Associate Professor Beuner. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Reading of easy 
prose. Reading and interpretation of Dante's Divine Comedy, 
partly in the original and partly in English. Three hours a ween. 

ENGLISH:. 

Thomas Hume, D.D., LL.D., Professor of English Literature. 
Charles Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., Professor of the English l,anguage. 
George McFarland McKie, Instructor in Expression and in English. 
William Stanly Bernard, A.B., Instructor in English. 
John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus, A.B., Assistant in English. 
Bartholomew Fuller Huske, Assistant in English. 

English Language. 
For Undergraduates. 

Messrs. McKie and Bernard. 

1 . Rhetoric and composition. Three hottrs a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a degree. 

2. English composition and the history of English literature. 

Intended for those who have completed the work of course 1. 
Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a degree. 

Professor Smith. 
4. Essays and Orations. Lectures on the essay and oration as forms of 
discourse. Representative essayists and orators read and analyzed. 
Construction of essays and orations. Two hoars a week. 

6. Introduction to English philology. An elementary course in philol- 



THE CATALOGUE 39 

ogy, Old English prose, Middle English prose and verse, and the 
general principles of language growth. Two hoars a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

7. Old English and Middle English. A study by lectures and readings 

of the development of the English language and literature from 
the earliest period to the year 1500. Two hours a week. 

For Graduates. 

12. The evolution of English syntax. A survey of the work of Paul, 
Wulfing, Brifal and Jespersen. Application to the syntax of 
Modern English. Original investigations. Two hours a week. 
Not given in 1902-03. ' 

English Literature. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Hume. 
3. Poetics. The Old Ballads, Longer English Poems. Special study of 
Tennyson. Southern Poets. History of English Literature. 
Critical Theses. Two hours a week. 

5. The History and Philosophy of Literature. Shakspere's English His- 
tory Plays. Middle Comedy and Tragedy. Milton's Paradise 
Lost. Wordsworth. Taine's History of Literature. Theses. 
Two hours a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

8. Poetry and Criticism. A study of the art of poetry in general and of 

the principles of criticism. Ttuo hours a week. 

9. The Rise and Progress of the Drama from the Mystery Plays to the 



40 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

seventeenth century. Ward's Dramatic Literature. Symonds's 
Predecessors of Shakspere. Schelling's Chronicle Plays. Manly's 
Pre- Shaksperean Plays and special editions. Tiro hours a week. 

10. Dramatic Seminary. The language, metrical forms, sources of plot 

and incident, construction of plays, comparative study of Shaks- 
pere and other dramatists. Two hours a week. 

11. The Literary Study of the Bible. Critical survey of the Psalms, Job, 

Isaiah, Proverbs. Influence of the Bible on literary development 
and form. Two hours a week. 

13. The Development of Fiction from the Greek romances to Scott. 
English Romanticism. Two hours a treek. 

Professor Smith. 

14. The historical novel. Discussion of the origin and development of Eng- 

lish historical fiction . Courses of reading ending in a study of the 
novels and short stories illustrative of North Carolina history. 
Two hours a week. 
To be omitted in 1903-04. 

15. A comparative study of Tennyson and Browning. A study of Brown- 

ing's complete works, with Tennyson as parallel reading. Criti- 
cal essays, with reports on sources and bibliography. Two hours a 

week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed courses 1-6 
and one of the courses for graduates. 

Expression, 

Mr. McKie. 

1. Declamation. Theory and practice. Voice culture and gestures. One 

hour a week. 

2. Theory of debate. Analysis of debates. Preparation of briefs. Theses. 

Lectures, prepared and extemporaneous. One hour a week. 
Open to those who have completed course 1. 

The full course of one hour a week for two years will be counted as 
one hour for one year toward a degree. 



THE CATALOGUE 41 

PHILOSOPHY. 

Henry Horace Williams, A.M., B.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

For Undergraduates. 

1. Psychology. Lectures, with text-books. Theses. Three hours a week. 

Elective, in the Junior year, with Economics 1 and History 5 as a 
requirement of all candidates for a degree. 

2. Logic. Lectures, with text-books. The study of logic in life. Two 

hours a weeh. 

3. Ethics. Criticisms and discussions. Two hours a week. 

4. Philosophy. Lectures. Theses. Study of the forces that shape life. 

Three hoars a week. 

For Graduates. 

5. Epistemology. Lectures. Theses. A study of the Critical Philoso- 

phy. First year: Prolegomena and Practical Reason and the 
works that prepared the way for Kant. Second year: Kritik der 
r'einen Vernunft. Three hours a week. 
Open to students who have taken courses 3 and 4. 

HISTORY. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, LL.D., Alumni Professor of History. 
Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 
Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Professor of Pedagogy. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Noble. 

J.- American History. A general course. Texts and source-book, sup- 
plemented by lectures. Three hours a week. 



42 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

3. Mediaeval European History. A general course covering the period 

400-1648. Text-hooks, readings and lectures. Two hours a week . 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

4. Modern European History. A general course covering the period 1648- 

1900. Text-books, readings and lectures. Two hours a week. 
Given in alternate years. To be omitted in 1903-04. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Professor Battle. 

5. English History. A general survey of the political and constitutional 

development. Text-book, with lectures and reports. Three hours 

a week. 

Elective, in the Junior year, with Philosophy 1 and Economics 1, as 
a requirement of all candidates for a degree. 

6. North Carolina History. The political and constitutional development 

of the Colony and the State . Lectures. Theses on assigned topics 
required. Two hours a week. 

7. Constitutional History. A general survey of the history and princi- 

ples of the constitutions of the leading nations, ancient and mod- 
ern. A special study of the constitution of the United States, with 
the principal judicial decisions thereon. Also lectures on the 
leading principles of International Law. Three hours a week. 

8. Bible History. Lectures each Sunday morning at the instance of the 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

o) Old Testament Characters. Given in 1902-03. 
b) New Testament Characters. To be given in 1903-04. 
Not counted for a degree. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

9. Historical Seminary. Original research in the history of the United 

States and of North Carolina during the national and state per- 
iod. Weekly reports required. Two hours a week. 



THE CATALOGUE 43 

Open to graduates, Seniprs and special students who have passed with 
honor on at least six hours in history. 

Asssociate Professor Raper. 

10. English and American Colonial History. Lectures and research in 

the history of the English Colonies in North America. Two hours 

a week. 
Open to graduates and Seniors who have passed with honor on at 

least six hours in history. 
Given in alternate years. To be given in 1903-04. 

A certificate is granted upon the completion of courses 1, 5, 6, 7 and 
9, or any thirteen hours. 
c 

For Graduates. 

Professor Battle. 

11. The English Constitution. Research in the history of the founda- 

tion and development of the Constitution of England. Two hours 
a week. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

12. The English Royal Province. Lectures and reports on the Eng- 

lish crown colonies in North America. Two hours a week. 

Professor Battle. 

13. The American Constitution. Research in the history of the founda- 

tion and development of the Constitution of the United States. 
Two hours a week. 

14. American Politics. Research in the history and development of the 

political parties in the United States, and their struggles in Con- 
gress and before the people. Two hours a week. 

ECONOMICS AND FINANCE. 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 
1. Economics. A general course. Marshall's Principles of Economics, 



4A THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

supplemented by lectures and readings. Tivo hours a week. 
Elective, in the Junior year, with Philosophy 1 and History 5, as a 
requirement of all candidates for a degree. 

2. Economics, (a) Finance. Adams' The Science" of Finance, supple- 

mented by lectures and readings. Two hours a week (fall term). 
(b) A Study in Tariff, Trusts, Railroad Transportation, Foreign 
Commerce and Labor Unions in the United States. Lectures and 
readings. Two hours a meek (spring term). 

3. Economics. The Economic History of England and the United States. 

Lectures, readings and reports. Two hours a week. 

Courses 1 and 2 open to Juniors and Seniors. Course 3 open to Sen- 
iors and graduate students. 
A certificate is granted upon the completion of courses 1, 2 and 3. 

MATHEMATICS. 

William Cain, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 
♦Archibald Henderson, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Marvin Hendrix Stacy, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
George Phiper Stevens, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Cain, Messrs. Stacy and Stevens. 

1. Plane and Solid Geometry, from Book IV to end (Wells). Algebra, 

from Quadratics to end (Wentworth's College Algebra). Four 
hours a week. 
Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a degree. 

Professor Cain. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, with Logarithms (Crockett). An- 

alytic Geometry (Tanner and Allen). Three hours a week. 
Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a degree. 

* Absent on leave, 



THE CATALOGUE 45 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 

3. Descriptive Geometry (Willson). Surveying (Raymond). Three hours 

a week. 

Professor Cain. 

4. Gibson's Differential and Integral Calculus. Three hours a week. . 

6. Differential Equations (Murray). Higher Trigonometry (Lock). 
Three hours a week. 
Prerequisite, course 4. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 

7.- Analytic Mechanics (Bowser). Hydraulics (Merriman). Three hours 
a week. 
Prerequisite, course 4. ' 

8. Projective Geometry (Reye, Cremona). Three hours a week. 
Professor Cain. 

9. Mechanics of Materials. Stresses in Bridge and Roof Trusses (Merri- 

man, Johnson, Cain). Three hours a week. 
Prerequisite, course 7. 

For Graduates Only. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 
12. Solid Analytic Geometry (Smith, Salmon, Frost). Two hours a week. 
Prerequisite, course 4. 

Professor Cain. 
14. Advanced Differential and Integral Calculus (Byerly, Edwards). Lec- 
tures. Two hours a week. 
Prerequisite, course 4. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed, with high 
grade, courses 1, 2 and 4. 

PHYSICS. 

Joshua Walker Gore, C.E., Professor of Physics. 



46 THE UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

James Edward Mills, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 
Richard Henry McFadyen, Assistant in Physics. 
Prank Lee Foust, Assistant in Physics. 

Dr. Mills. 

Elementary Physics. Lectures, recitations, weekly written reviews. Three 
hours a week. 
Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science who 
have not offered Physics in satisfaction of the entrance require- 
ments. Elective with French 1 or German 1 as a requirement of 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy who have not 
offered any one of these subjects at entrance. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Gore. 

1. A general course. Lectures with text-hook. Laboratory work (with 

Mr. McFadyen). Three hours a week. 
Elective, in Sophomore year, with Chemistry 1, as a requirement 
of candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Philosophy. 
*Mr. Latta. 

2. Mechanics, including Statics and Dynamics. Three hours a week. 

Professor Gore. 

3. Heat, Heat Engines, Heating Systems, Steam Boilers, Pumps, etc. 

Lectures, text-books and laboratory. Three hours a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. Electricity and Magnetism, Dynamos, Motors, Electric Lighting, Stor- 

age Batteries. Lectures, text-books and laboratory. Three hours 
a week. 

5. Descriptive Astronomy. A general course with a brief history of 

Astronomy. Two hours a week. 

•Absent on leave 1902-03. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 47 

For Graduates. 



6. Heat and Light. Two hours a week. 

7. Polyphase Electric Currents. Electrical Transmission of Power. 

Three hours a week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed Courses 1, 3, 
4 and 5. 



CHEMISTRY. 



Charles Baskerville, Ph.D., Smith Professor of General and Industrial 
Chemistry . 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic Chemis- 
try. 

James Edward Mills, Ph.D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

Royall Oscar Eugene Davis, Ph.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Hugh Hammond Bennett, Assistant in Chemistry. 

Hazel Holland, Assistant in Chemistry. 



For Undergraduates. 



Professor Baskerville, Dr. Mills and Mr. Davis. 
1. Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. A study of 
the elements and their compounds, including an introduction to 
organic chemistry. Laboratory work required. Three hours a 
week. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for the degree of 

Bachelor of Science. 
Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Physics 1, as a requirement 

of all candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 

of Philosophy. 
3 



48 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Professor Baskerville. x 

2. Technical Chemistry. 

(a) Metallurgy. Mining, treatment of ores, smelirjg, chlorina- 
tiou, etc. Three hours it week {fall term). 

(b) Industrial and Agricultural Chemistry. Glass-making, acids, 
alkalies, phosphates, foods, clothing, hygiene, etc. Three hours it 
week (sprint/ term). 

Associate Professor Wheeler, Mr. Davis and Mr. Bennett. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work with lectures. Tiro hours u 

week. 

Associate Professor Wheeler and Dr. Mills. 

4. Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work and Stoichiom- 

etry. A grounding in analytical methods. Three hours n meek. 



For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

5. Organic Chemistry. Lectures. Tiro hours a week. Laboratory work. 

One or three hours it week. 

One or two hours may be devoted to experimental work in some 
special group, as the cellulose, the terpene, the pyridine or the 
alkaloid. 

Professor Venable. 

6. The theories of Chemistry. Lectures. Two hours it week. 

Dr. Mills. 

7. Physical and Electro-Chemistry. Lectures and text-books, with lab- 

oratory work. Applications of electricity to chemical processes. 
Three hours it week. 

Professor Baskerville. 

8. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Gas analysis and extension 

of Course 4 in technical lines. Bacteriological examination of 
water (with Professor Manning). Research. Five hours a week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed all the above 
Courses except 7, ard submitted a thesis upon some research suc- 
cessfully carried out in the laboratory. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECOKD 49 

For Graduates'. 

Professor Baskerville. 

11. Research in. Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry. Six limes <i week. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

12. Research in Organic Chemistry. Six times a -week. 

Professor Baskerville. 

14. Lectures on the Rare Elements. Once a week. 

To be omitted in 1903-04. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

15. Lectures on Cellulose and the Coal Tar Products. Once a week. 
cOmitted in 1902-03. 

The Journal Club meets Monday afternoons for one hour. Reviews 
of the chemical journals. Participation in the discussions required 
of students in Courses 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 14 and 15. 

BIOLOGY. 

♦Henry Van Peters Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

James Edwin Duerden, Ph.D., A.R.C.S., (Lond.), Acting Professor of 

Biology. 
William Chambers Coker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
Clarence Albert Shore, S.M., Instructor in Biology. 
Ivey Foreman Lewis, A.B., Assistant in Biology. 
Fred Moir Hanes, Assistant in Biology. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Duerden and Associate Professor Coker. 

1. General Biology. Introductory course. Fundamental principles 

worked out on selected animal and plant types. Lectures with 

laboratory work. Five hours a week. 

Elective, in the Junior year, with Geology 3, as a requirement of 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

* Absent on leave, 1902-03, 



50 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Professor Duerdex and Mr. Shore. 

2. Mammalian Anatomy. Osteology and dissection of cat. May be pur- 

sued simultaneously with Biology 1. Laboratory work. Three- 
hours a week (fall term). 

3. Vertebrate Histology. Microscopic structure of principal tissues and 

organs. Elements of microscopic technique. May be pursued 
simultaneously with Biology 1 . Lectures with laboratory work. 
Three hours a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Associate Professor Coker. 

4. Botany. Structure and habits of selected cryptogams and flowering 

plants, with an introduction to vegetable physiology. Laboratory 
work. Three hours a week. 

Professor Duerden. 

5. Zoology. Comparative anatomy of the chief invertebrate and verte- 

brate classes. Introduction to systematic zoology of a class. Lec- 
tures with laboratory work. Three hours a week. 

(i. Vertebrate Embryology. Maturation, fertilization, segmentation and 
formation of germ layers in nematode, amphibian and teleost eggs. 
Development of the characteristic vertebrate organs in chick em- 
bryos. Lectures with laboratory work. Three hours a week 
(spring term) . 

For Graduates. 

7. Animal Morphology. Advanced zoological work, with detailed study 

of problems in comparative anatomy or embryology. Laboratory 
work with use of classical text-books and original memoirs. Theses. 
Fire hours or more a week. 

Associate Professor Coker. 

8. Plant Morphology. Comparative anatomy of the principal plant 

groups. Lectures and laboratory work. Five hours or more a week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 
Courses 1-6 inclusive. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 51 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Collier Cobb, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Robert Gilliam Lassiter, Assistant in Geology. 

Robert Arthur Lichtenthaeler, S.B., Assistant in Geology. 



For Undergraduates. 

1. Elementary Geology. Lectures with field work; laboratory work on 

the common minerals and rocks. Three hours a iijeek. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 

2. Mineralogy. Lectures with laboratory and field work. Crosby's 

Tables and Dana's Text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours a week. 

3. General Critical Geology. Lectures with field work; laboratory work 

on rocks and fossils. Theses. Three hours a week. 

Elective, in the Junior year, with Biology 1 as a requirement of can- 
didates for the degree of' Bachelor of Science. 

4. Economic Geology. Lectures with laboratory and field work. Ore 

deposits, economic minerals, soils, water supply. Three hours a 
week. 

5. Petrography. Lectures, laboratory work and theses. Two hours a 

week. 

For Graduates. 

6. Advanced field work and special research in geology or geography. 

Problems assigned individually and work adapted to the profes- 
sional needs of the student. Three hours a week. 

7. Research course in historical geology. Three hours a week. 

8. Origin and Nature of Soils. Field work, laboratory work and theses. 

Three hours a week (spring term). 

Advanced students are permitted to accompany the instructors in 
field work during the holidays and in the summer. 

In addition to the above Courses, short series of lectures are from 



52 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



time to time given to the students of geology by members of the 
North Carolina Geological Survey. 

A Journal Club meets fortnightly for review and discussion of cur- 
rent geological literature. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit- 
six courses and presented a thesis showing original research suc- 
cessfully carried out. 



PEDAGOGY. 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Professor of Pedagogy. 
For Undergraduates. 

1. The Science of Education. DeGarmo's Essentials of Method. The 

practical application of scientific principles to the teaching of ele- 
mentary branches. A brief study of modern educational problems. 
Thri'i' hums ti week (full term). 

2. The Art of Teaching. McMurray's General Method. A careful study 

of the principles and methods involved in successfully teaching 

those studies usually taught in the best public and private primary 

schools. Three hours a week (spring term). 

Preparation of model lessons according to pedagogical principles has 
a place in both Courses. ■ 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. The Philosophy of Education. Science and Practice of Education, 

Herbart. Comparative study of the different systems of education 
in the several States of the Union. The development and arrange- 
ment of a High School course. Three limns a week (full term). 

4. The General History of Education. The development of educational 

ideals in the past . The effect of the pedagogical doctrines of the great 
educators of the past upon modern educational systems. Seeley's 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 53 

History of Education. Monroe's Educational Ideal. Three hours 
a week (spring term). 

5. The study of childhood in transforming modern methods of studying 

and teaching educational science. Two hours a week. 

6. Herbartian Pedagogy. The attempt is made in this Course to inves- 

tigate the Herbartian movement in Germany and the United States. 
The works of Rein, Story, Ziller, Lange and others are studied. 
Two hours a week. 

Given alternately with Course 5. 

Pedagogical theses will be required in all Courses. 



GEADCJATE STUDENTS. 



ADMISSION. 



Graduates of the University of North Carolina and of other universities 
and colleges of good standing are, on application to the Faculty, ordinari- 
ly admitted to advanced courses of instruction, free of charge for tuition. 
An applicant for admission, unless a graduate of the University of North 
Carolina, is required to present a certificate of scholarship and character, 
or his diploma, if he has a degree. 

DEGREES. 

The University offers to graduate students advanced work leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts (A.M.), Master of Science (S.M.), and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). 

Blaster of Arts. 

Any Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy of the University of 
North Carolina, or any student holding one of these degrees from another 
university or college approved by the Faculty, may become a candidate for 
the degree of Master of Arts by making written application to the Presi- 
dent and Faculty and paying the University fees.. The candidate shall 
complete satisfactorily one year of graduate work in residence. This year 
of graduate work shall include at least fifteen hours a week of recitations 
or lectures with one major and two minor courses forming a consistent plan 
of work to be pursued with] some definite aim. The number of minor 
courses may be increased to three by special action of the Faculty. 

No course open to undergraduates below the Junior year can be counted 
for a Master's degree. At least five hours of work must be chosen from 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 55 

courses designated "For Graduates," outlined above on pages 32-53. 

Bachelors of Philosophy who apply for the degree of Master of Arts 
must offer au ancient language as one of their subjects of study. 

A thesis showing capacity for research and power of independent thought 
and based on the major subject of study, must be submitted on or before 
May 1st of the given year, and must be filed in corrected and typewritten 
form on or before May 15th. 

Candidates who have received the Bachelor's degree from the Universi- 
ty of North Carolina may be recommended for the Master's degree after 
at least two years of study, as non-resident students, the requirements be- 
ing in all other respects the same as for resident students; and they must 
satisfy the Faculty by examinations and by their theses that they are 
worthy of recommendation for the degree. The work must be com- 
pleted within the period of two years for which the registration is grant- 
ed; otherwise a second registration fee must be paid at the expiration of 
two years. The fee for non-resident students is ten dollars. 

Master of Science. 

The Faculty will recommend students for the degree of Master of Science 
under the same conditions outlined for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required to pursue, 
in residence at the University, a prescribed course of advanced study and 
research. In general a term of three years is required, but the degree may 
be secured in two years in the case of exceptional preliminary training in 
the major subject. 

These requirements of residence and study are, however, entirely sec- 
ondary. The degree is conferred not simply for faithful study in a deter- 
minate field of work for a prescribed period, but because of a high attain- 
ment in a special branch of learning, which the candidate must have man- 
ifested not only by examination, but by a thesis which gives evidence of 
independent research, and contributes to knowledge. The candidate should 
choose his major subject in a department in which he has already pursued, 



56 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

for a considerable period, a systematic course of study. To receive this de- 
gree, a knowledge of French and German will he found indispensable in 
most instances . The thesis must be accepted before the candidate may be 
admitted to examination. The examinations are both written and oral. 
They demand a minute knowledge of a special field of work as well as a 
general acquaintance with the department of learning in which the candi- 
date offers himself for the degree. 

Honorary Degrees. 
No honorary degrees are conferred by the University of North Carolina. 

ADMISSION OF WOMEN. 

Graduates and advanced students from institutions for the training of 
women will be admitted to the Graduate School and to such higher courses 
of instruction as the Faculty may direct. They will be admitted on the 
same conditions with men and enjoy the same privileges. Graduates of 
accredited institutions receive free tuition. Others will be charged a fee 
according to the amount of work taken. 



PECUNIARY AID AND EXPENSES. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal in Mathematics. (Established in 1874.) A gold 
medal is offered by J. Allen Holt and Martin H. Holt, the principals of 
Oak Ridge Institute, to that student who shall take the highest rank in 
Mathematics 3. No student will be recommended for the medal unless he 
attain to grade 2. 

The Hume Medal in English Composition. (Established in 1890.) A 
gold medal is offered by Professor Thomas Hume to that member of the 
Senior Class who shall present the best essay or thesis on some distinctly 
literary subject. 

The Mangum Medal in Oratory. (Established in 1878.) The Miss- 
es Mangum, of Orange county, offer in memory of their father, Willie Per- 
son Mangum, a gold medal to that member of the Senior Class who shall 
deliver the best oration at Commencement. 

The Bingham Prize in Debate. This prize is offered iw p w "--- 



= p, ,™ in History (Established in 1896.) A prize of flf- 
The Hill Pkiz*. in History, v member 

teen dollars is offered by John Sprunt Hul, of New York <**. 
of the Class of 1889, for the best thesis on som £-- the^ 
North Carolina, the subject to be selected oy 



„ «.* giouuiue sr.uaent, for the best thesis containing original 

work in the geology or mineralogy of North Carolina. 

The Greek Prize. (Established in 1887.) A prize of ten dollars is 
offered to that member of the Sophomore class who shall present the best 
rendering into English of selected passages of Greek not previously read. 



56 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

for a considerable period, a systematic course of study. To receive this de- 
gree, a knowledge of French and German will be found indispensable in 
most instances. The thesis must be accepted before the candidate may be 
admitted to examination. The examinations are both written and oral. 
They demand a minute knowledge of a special field of work as well as a 
general acquaintance with the department of learning in which the candi- 
date offers himself for the degree. 

Honorary Degrees. 

No honorary degrees are conferred by the University of North Carolina. 

ADMISSION OF "WOMEN. 

Graduates and advanced students from institutions for the training of 
women will be admitted to the Graduate School and to such higher courses 
of instruction as the Facility may direct. They will be admitted on the 
same conditions with men and enjoy the same privileges. Graduates of 
accredited institutions receive free tuition. Others will be charged a fee 
according to the amount of work taken. 



PECUNIARY AID AND EXPENSES. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal in Mathematics. (Established in 1874.) A gold 
medal is offered by J. Allen Holt and Martin H. Holt, the principals of 
Oak Ridge Institute, to that student who shall take the highest rank in 
Mathematics 3. No student will be recommended for the medal unless he 
attain to grade 2. 

The Hume Medal in English Composition. (Established in 1890.) A 
gold medal is offered by Professor Thomas Hume to that member of the 
Senior Class who shall present the best essay or thesis on some distinctly 
literary subject. 

The Mangum Medal in Oratory. (Established in 1878.) The Miss- 
es Mangum, of Orange county, offer in memory of their father, Willie Per- 
son Mangum, a gold medal to that member of the Senior Class who shall 
deliver the best oration at Commencement. 

The Bingham Prize in Debate^ This prize is offered by R. W. Bing- 
ham, Esq., in memory of his great-grandfather, grandfather, father and 
brother. It is open to any student of the University and given annually 
for excellence in debate. The contestants are representatives of the Liter- 
ary Societies, and the contest is held on Tuesday night of Commencement 
week. 

The Kerr Prize in Geology and Mineralogy. (Established in 1889.) 
A prize of fifty dollars is offered by William H. Kerr, of Baltimore, Md., 
in memory of bis father, Professor Washington Oaruthers Kerr, to any 
undergraduate or graduate student, for the best thesis containing original 
work in the geology or mineralogy of North Carolina. 

The Greek Prize. (Established in 1887.) A prize of ten dollars is 
offered to that member of the Sophomore class who shall present the best 
rendering into English of selected passages of Greek not previously read. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

The Worth Prize in Philosophy. (Established in 1883.) Mr. Charles 
Williams Worth, in memory of his father, David Gaston Worth, of the 
class of 1853, will print the best thesis submitted by a student in Philoso- 
phy 4. 

The Early English Text Society Prize. A special prize is offered 
by the Early English Text Society, of London, for advanced work in Anglo- 
Saxon and Middle English. 

The Bryan Prize. In 1903 and thereafter a prize will be given annu- 
ally for the best thesis in Political Science. This prize has besu establish- 
ed by Mr. William Jennings Bryan. 

The Library Prizes. In 1903 two prizes of the value of $10 and $5 
respectively will be awarded to the two members of the class of 1904 who 
do the best work upon the Library General Reading Course. 

The Magazine Prizes. Prizes are given for the best essay and the 
two best pieces of fiction published in the University Magazine. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Cameron Scholarships. (Established in 1892.) The heirs of 
Paul Carrington Cameron founded, in his memory, ten scholarships of the 
value of sixty dollars each. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies' Scholar- 
ships. (Established in 1893.) The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary 
Societies of the University founded two scholarships of the value of sixty 
dollars each, recipients of which shall give assistance in the Library. 

The Moore Scholarships. (Established in 1881.) Bartholomew Fig- 
ures Moore, of Raleigh, bequeathed fiye thousand dollars, the interest of 
which shall be devoted to paying the tuition of students. 

The Mary Ann Smith Scholarships. (Established in 1891.) Miss 
Mary Ann Smith bequeathed thirty-seven thousand dollars for the founda- 
tion of scholarships, the number of scholarships to be determined by the 
amount of income. 

The Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships, (Established in 1885). Miss. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 59 

Mary Ruffin Smith bequeathed to the University, in memory of her broth- 
er, Dr. Francis Jones Smith, a valuable tract of land in Chatham county, 
of about fourteen hundred and sixty acres, known as Jones' Grove.' The 
will provides that "the rents of the land, or the interest of the purchase 
money, if sold, shall be used to pay the tuition of such poor students as the 
Faculty shall appoint." 

The Speight Scholarships. (Established in 1895.) The late Mrs. 
Mary Shepherd Speight bequeathed ten thousand dollars to the Universi- 
ty. The income shall be used to pay the tuition of needy students; but if 
tuition is ever made free, the income shall be used towards paying the sal- 
aries of the professors. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1892.) Mrs. Mary Sprunt 
Wood, of Wilmington, has founded in memory of her late husband, Dr. 
Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value of sixty dollars. 

The Weil Scholarship. (Established in 1898.) A fund, estab- 
lished by Henry Weil, of Goldsboro, furnishes one scholarship of the value 
of sixty dollars. 

The Armfield Scholarship. (Established in 1901.) This scholar- 
ship of sixty dollars is given by Eugene M. Armfield, of High Point. 

The Alumni Scholarships. These scholarships have been established 
by the gifts of the Alumni. A scholarship will be awarded for each one 
thousand dollars given. 

By the terms of these bequests no scholarships may be given to students 
in the professional schools of Law, Medicine and Pharmacy. 

All applications for scholarships must be filed in the President's office 
on or before August 15, and must be in the regular form prescribed by the 
University. Blank forms are supplied on application to the Registrar. 



FREE TUITION. 

By an act of the Legislature in 1887, free tuition is given, in the College, 
to candidates for the ministry, to the sons of ministers, to young men un- 
der bodily infirmity, to teachers and young men preparing to teach. This 



60 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

enables the University to aid most effectively the public school teachers of 
the State. 

LOAN FUNDS. 

The Deems Fund. (Established in 1879.) A fund of six hundred dol- 
lars was established by Dr. Charles F. Deems, late pastor of the Church of 
the Strangers, New York City, formerly a Professor in the University, in 
memory of his son, Lieutenant Theodore Disosway Deems. In 1881 the 
fund was greatly enlarged, through the munificence of Mr. William H. 
Vanderbilt, by a gift of ten thousand dollars, "as an addition to the Deems 
Fund, to be loaned to indigent students of the University." 

Applications for loans will not be considered unless accompanied by tes- 
timonials from responsible persons as to poverty and merit. The funds 
are limited in amount and are loaned only on the security of two approved 
signatures and at the legal rate of interest. 

By the terms of these bequests no loans may be made to students in the 
professional schools of Law, Medicine and Pharmacy. 

All applications for loans must be filed in the President's office on or 
before August 15. 

EXPENSES. 

Every effort is made to reduce to the lowest point the necessary expens- 
es of an education at the University. The charges for each of the two 
terms are as follows: — 

Tuition fee $30.00 

. Registration fee 5.00 

Medical and Infirmary fee 3.00 

Gymnasium fee 1.25 

Library fee 2.00 

Total $41.25 

The library fee is one dollar a term for members of the Dialectic 
and Philanthropic Literary Societies. Students taking courses in the lab- 






THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 61 

oratories are charged a small fee for materials. Every student must keep 
on deposit with the Bursar two dollars as security for damages. Willful 
damage to University property is charged to the perpetrator, if known: 
otherwise it is assessed upon all students of the University. Any balance 
is returned to the student at the end of the year. 

Good hoard is furnished at Commons for eight dollars a month. A few 
students earn their board at Commons by waiting on the tables. In pri- 
vate clubs board may be reduced to a minimum of six dollars a month. 
The entire annual expenses need not exceed three hundred dollars, and 
they may be reduced to two hundred dollars. 

From a number of itemized reports handed in by students, the following 
averages have been made. These give total expenses, exclusive of clothes 
and traveling. The average was taken in three classes. Tha first includes 
those who pay no tuition and wait at C-mmons, thus having no board to 
pay. The minimum expense account given under this heading was $57.00, 
the average $63.60. Secondly, the average expenses of those who pay 
board but no tuition, was $144.61. Lastly, the average expenses of those 
who pay both board and tuition was $265.25, the maximum being $500.00. 

It is confidently believed that no institution offers wider opportunities 
of self-help to meritorious students of slender means. The desire is that 
no worthy boy, however poor, shall ever be turned away for lack of means. 
To such the University and town offer unusual opportunities for support. 
Many students are now working their way through College by every form 
of honorable labor. A number are here as the result of money earned or 
borrowed. Fifty are aided by loans, and over nine hundred have received 
aid from the University in loans and scholarships in the past twenty years. 
A few students are selected by the authorities as waiters at Commons. 
Otherwise all opportunities, though available in the University and town, 
must be secured by the personal effort of the individual, or with the assist- 
ance of the Faculty Committee on Self-help. They are not assigned by 
the President. 

DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The University buildings contain one hundred and seventy-four double 
rooms, available for the accommodation of students; none are furnished; 



62 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

there is no charge for service in addition to the rent. All rooms are 
fitted with electric lights. For these a fee of 75 cents per month 
is charged. If the room has two occupants, the price is one half that sum 
for each. Room rent ranges from 75 cents to $2.75 per month for each oc- 
cupant, the price depending upon the location of the room. 

All the buildings of the University are heated by hot water according to 
the most improved methods. In the dormitories the charge for heating 
will be one dollar per month for each room, or 50 cents for each occupant of 
a room. 



REGULATIONS REGARDING 

STUDENTS. 



REGISTRATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF ROOMS. 

All students are expected to present themselves for registration on Mon- 
day, Tuesday or Wednesday, September 7, 8 or 9, 1903, and Saturday, Mon- 
day or Tuesday, January 2, 4 or 5, 1904, between the hours of 9 a. m. and 
4 p. m., at the office of the Registrar. 

A student who presents himself for registration after the dates and times 
named shall pay a fee of two dollars in addition to the regular fee. 

Students desiring to retain their rooms in the College buildings must 
give formal notice to the Bursar before May 20th. Previous occupants of 
rooms, if not present to claim them at the times and places annually de- 
signated for the assignment of rooms, will forfeit their rights to siich 
rooms. 

According to the contract for rooms, it is provided that the occupants 
shall be responsible for all damages committed in or upon the room during 
their occupancy, as well as for damage committed by them upon any Uni- 
versity property; and that any malicious or wanton damage or any mali- 
cious or wanton or repeated disturbance of College order shall be a forfeiture 
of all right to dwell in a College building. The President reserves also the 
right to require any student whom for any reason he considers an undesir- 
able tenant to vacate a room in the College buildings. 

The President may by official disapproval of any boarding-place in the 
village, require students to avoid such boarding-place. 

STANDING. 



Semi-annual reports of the standing of all students in all the studies of 
5 



64 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

the previous term are sent to parents or guardians, based upou the follow- 
ing scale of marking: — 

Grade 1, 95-100 per cent. 
Grade 2, 90-95 per cent. 
Grade 3, 80-90 per cent. 
Grade 4, 70-80 per cent. 
Grade 5, 50-70 per cent. 
Grade 6, below 50 per cent. 
Students must attain a grade of at least 4 to pass in any study; those 
receiving grade 6 in any study must take such study over again with a 
class. 

No student shall be allowed to take less than 15, nor more than 18 hours 
of class-room work per week without special permission of the Faculty or 
the President. 

Students desiring to change their courses must make written application 
to the President for the desired change. The application will be considered 
by the President and the instructors in the departments concerned and 
will be granted only after a careful consideration of the facts in each case. 
No changes will be permitted after the first two weeks of the term except 
such as are granted after application to, and approval by the Faculty. 

A student who at the close of the period of special examinations in Sep- 
tember, is deficient by an amount equal to eight hours of class-room work 
for a year shall be ranked with the next lower class. 

A student who has failed to pass all the examinations of the yeax - in any 
College study may not take a higher class in that department, until he make 
good his deficiency. 

ABSENCES. 

In any term, absences are counted from the first regular meeting of each 
class. In no case will a student be considered present at any class unless 
he has been regularly registered as a member of that class. Students will 
be subject to the discipline of the Faculty when the total unexcused ab- 
sences in any month amount to five. 

Any student whose absences from a class during any month amount to 






THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 65 

as much as 25 per cent, of the scheduled meetings of the class, is required 
to stand a special examination on that month's work, according to the 
schedule laid down helow. 

In the case of those whose absences in a given month amount to 25 per 
cent., or more, of the scheduled meetings of the class, and who fail to stand 
the examination provided for such absences, it is left to the discretion of 
the instructor to retain them in the class. 

Students who are absent from a class during the months of December 
and May as much as 25 per cent, of the scheduled meetings of the class, 
must stand an examination for these months before being entitled to any 
grade on term examination. This special examination is to be held in con- 
nection with the regular term examination, or at some time during the 
examination period. 

Students who are absent during any term as much as 33^ 3 per cent, of 
the scheduled meetings of the class, except in case of prolonged sickness 
necessitating at least half of the absences, may at the discretion of the in- 
structor be debarred from standing the term examination. 

Schedule of Examinations to be Held Each Month for 
Excess of Absences. 

Last Saturday of Month. 

French and German, all classes and sections, 

Greek, 

Latin, 

Biology, 

First Saturday in New Month. 

Mathematics, all classes and sections, 

Geology, 

Chemistry, 

Physics, 

Second Saturday in New Month. 

History and Economics, all classes and sections, 8:45 " 
English, 9:45 " 

Philosophy, at night. 



8:45 o 


'clock. 


9:45 


(i 


11:00 


" 


12:00 


(( 


8:45 


ft 


10:00 


if 


11:00 


ft 


12:00 


a 



66 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

A student who is absent from the class-room any considerable portion of 
the recitation hour will be reported absent by the instructor. 

Attendance at Chapel is compulsory for all students in the University 
except for members of the professional schools and for such others as are 
specially excused. Absence from Chapel will subject the student to dis- 
cipline by the Executive . 

No student is allowed to absent himself from the University without 
written permission from the President or his representative. This permis- 
sion may, at the discretion of the executive officer, be granted only upon the 
formal request of the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Each student, before being entitled to any grade upon an examination, 
is required to subscribe his name to the following pledge: "I hereby cer-, 
tify that during this examination I have neither given nor received aid." 

Students who hand in papers at the regular examinations axe considered 
to have relinquished any claim to special examinations for grades. Stu- 
dents who fail to attend regular examinations, or who fail to hand in 
papers, are regarded as handing in blank papers, unless they have been 
previously excused from the examinations. 

Excuses from examinations are granted only in case of absolute necessity. 
Such an excuse, to be valid, must be obtained from the President on or be- 
fore the day of the examination, and communicated officially on that day 
to the instructor holding the examination. 

A student wishing a special examination must deposit an application in 
the office of the Registrar at least one week before the beginning of the 
period of special examinations. 

A student who has been excused from an examination or has failed to 
pass, may have opportunity to make good his deficiency, without taking 
the study over again at the following times: 

(a.) At the next succeeding regular examination period. 

(ft.) At the period of special examinations in September preceding the 
regular work of the session . 

(c.) At the regular examination of the same class a year from the time 
when the deficiency was incurred. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



67 



(d.) If the deficiency be in a Junior or Senior study, either at one of the 
above-mentioned times, or at a special examination to be held in each study 
at the time scheduled for the first monthly special examination in that 
study after the opening of the term in January of the Senior year. 

A student having a deficiency in a Freshman study not made up by the 
close of the period of special examinations in September preceding his 
Junior year, and a student having a deficiency in a Sophomore study not 
made up by the close of the period of special examinations preceding his 
Senior year, shall be required to take such study over again with the class, 
or, in the case of an elective study, to take another one in its place. 

The last opportunity to make up deficiencies occurring later than the 
beginning of the Junior year is at the special examination period men- 
tioned above, except that Seniors failing to pass an examination in May 
may have one special examination during the examination period in May. 

Only those who have been excused from the regular examination may 
take another for a grade. All others take it merely to pass. 

The order of examinations for the removal of conditions in September, 
1903, will be: 

Monday, September 7. 
10 A.M. Physics. 2:30 P.M. Chemistry. 



Tuesday, September 



10 A. M. Greek. 



2:30 P. M. History and 
Economics. 



Wednesday, September 9. 
10 A. M. English. 2:30 P. M. Biology. 

Thursday, September 10. 
10 A.M. German and French. 2:30 P.M. Mathematics. 



Friday, September 11. 
10 A. M. Latin. 2:30 P. M. Geology. 

Saturday, September 12. 
10 A. M. Philosophy. 2:30 P. M. Pedagogy, 



68 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

ATHLETIC AND OTHER ORGANIZATION'S. 

No student will be allowed to take part in athletics contests, concerts, 
debates, etc., entailing absence from the University, whose parent or 
guardian objects to such participation. 

A student who was in attendance upon the University during a previous 
term ur session must have passed satisfactory examinations upon at least 
six hours of work before he will be allowed to represent the University in 
an athletic contest or in any other public capacity. 

No student reported as deficient in a majority of his classes can partici- 
pate in any athletic contest or otherwise publicly represent the University, 
until the deficiency is made good. 

No team or club will be allowed to be absent from the University for 
more than five lecture days during the term. 

The manager of eacli athletic team or musical club shall submit to the 
President a schedule of all engagements before positive arrangements are 
made. 

No student shall be eligible for membership in an athletic team playing 
in intercollegiate contests, unless he has registered on or before October 12. 

No student who has received, or is receiving now, or has been promised 
directly or indirectly any money or compensation in lieu of money for 
athletic services, shall be eligible as a player upon any athletic team repre- 
senting the University, and each candidate for such position must sign a 
statement to the effect that he is not ineligible under this rule. 

FRATERNITIES. 

Academic students may join fraternities after registration in their Soph- 
■ oniore year. Fraternity men are not allowed to pledge Freshmen to join 
fraternities. 

GRADUATION. 

Each Senior will be officially informed by the Registrar in September of 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 69 

all deficiencies standing against him. These deficiencies must he made up 
by the close of the special examination periods in January and February. 

Every member of the Senior Glass is required to write a thesis, or an 
oration, for graduation. Those electing theses must announce their sub- 
jects by Feb. 1st to the Dean of the Faculty, who will report them to the 
Professors in the departments concerned. On May 2d the theses shall be 
read before the Professors, subject to criticism and correction. The cor 
rected and approved theses must be handed to the Registrar in type-written 
. form on or before May 15th. 

The number of orations is limited to four. The candidates must be 
members of the academic department, and must announce their subjects 
to the Dean of the Faculty by Feb. 1st. The orations shall be delivered 
in private before a committee of the Faculty on May 1st, who shall 
decide the relative merits of the orations. The four successful can- 
didates are known as the Commencement Orators of the Senior Class. 

Candidates for more than one degree shall not offer the same elective in 
two courses, nor a required study in one course as an elective in another. 

Students entering in advance of their course and desiring to compete for 
honors, must stand for grade all examinations required in their course pre- 
vious to the point of entering. 

CERTIFICATES. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed, in any depart- 
ment, all work required for a degree together with other elective work 
in the same department. (See under the several departments of instruc- 
tion.) 

CONDUCT. 

By order of the Board of Trustees the Faculty is directed to dismiss from 
the University any student who is known to engage in drinking intoxica- 
ting liquors, gambling, hazing in any form, or to be guilty of dissolute 
conduct. 

Students persistently neglectful of duty, or addicted to boisterous con- 
duct or rowdyism, may be requested to leave the University, 



70 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS. 





8 : 45 9 : 45 


10:40 11:35 


12:30 


2:30 




Eng. 1, 1, II Phys., Blem 


Latin 1,1 ;Math. 1,IV 


Latin 1, II 


Laboratory : 




Geology 1 'Latin 2, II 1 Greek 1, II ]Frenehl, I Greek 1, 1 Phys. 1,1" 




Math. 2, 1 English 2, 1 'English 1, IIIlHistory 1, II Math. 1, III ;Chem.l,I 




Physics 2 Philosophy HFreneh 1, III Chemistry 1 [English 3 


Biology 2 




Greek 3 


Economics 2 Latin 2, 1 


Math. 3 IPhysics 5 


Phys. 4 


Mon. 


German 2 


French 4 1 Physics 1 


German 3 Pedagogy 5 


Chemistry 4 


Math. 5 


Geology 4 ! Biology 1 
English 7 German 3 


Economics 3 jHistory 6 


Chemistry 7 


1 Greek 7 


History 5 




Chemistry 8 




Latin 10 


Math. 7 English 4 
Chemistry 7 Chemistry 6 


Pedagogy 
English 9 








Greek 9 


Math. 9 










English 13 








Latin 1, III French 1, II lLatin 1, 1 


Math. 1, IV 


Latin 1, II 


Laboratory : 




Math. I, I. IIjHistory 1, 1 Greek 1, II 


Philosophy 3 


Greek 1, 1 fPhys.l, II 




German 1, 1 Greek 2 iFrench 1,111 


Physics 4 


Math. 1. Ill |Chem. 1, II 




Spanish. 1 French 2 iEnglish 1,111 


Latin 3 


German 1, II ' Geology 2 




English 2, II Chemistry 2 ' Latin 2, 1 


Biology 3 


Math. 2, II Biology 3 


TtJES. 


Geology 3 Philosophy 4jPhysics 1 


Greek F, 10 


Pedagogy 1, 2 Biology 4 
Philosophy 2!Chemistry 4 


Physics 3 1 English 6 1 Biology 1 


Latin 7, 8 




History 3, 4 Math. 6, 8 jHistory 2 


History 10 


German 4 


Chemistry 7 




Pedagogy 3,4 


Geology 6 


Chemistry 6 


English 11 


Chemistry 5 


Chemistry 8 




Math. 4 


Latin 9, 6 




Math. 14 


Biology 6 






Greek 15 


Elem. Law 






History 7 
English 8 






English 14 
Latin 1, III 












Phys., Elem. 


Latin 1, 1 


Math. 1, IV 


Eng. 1,1,11 


Laboratory : 


VI;, ih. :, 1. II 1 ;iH)l ". li 


Greek 1, II 


French 1 , 1 


Geology 1 


Phys. 1, IH 




German 1, 1 English 2, 1 


English 3 


History 1, II 


Math. 2, 1 


Chern. 1, III 




Spanish 1 j Philosophy 1 Physics 5 


Cheni. 1 


Economics 1 


Chemistry 3 




English 2. II I French 3, 4 Pedagogy 5 


Math. 3 


Physics 2 


Biology 3 


Wed. 


Physics 3 j Geology 4 


History 6 


Economics 3 


German 2 


Biology 4 


Geology 3 Chemistry 7 


I Greek 4 


English 5 


Chemistry 4 




Pedagogy 3,4 'English 7 




Latin 5, 4 


French 5 


Chemistry 7 


Math, i" Math. 7 




History 5 


Math. 5 


Chemistry 8 


English 14 Gr^ekS 




Pedagogy 6 


Greek 7 






English 13 




Math 9 


Latin 10 










English 12 








Latin, 1, III 'French 1,11 


Latin 1, 1 


Phys. Elem. 


Latin 1, II 


Laboratory : 




Math. 1. I, II | History 1,1 


Greek 1, II 


Latin 2, II 


Greek 1, I 


Physics 1, IV 




German 1, I .Greek 2 


English 1,111 


English 2,1 


Math. 1, III 


Chem. 1, IV 




Spanish 1 French 2 


French 1, III 


Philosophy 1 


German 1,11 


Biology 1, 1 




English 2, II Chemistry 2 


Latin 2, 1 


Economics 2 


Math. 2, H 


Biology 2 


m WInJ Physics 3 jPhilosoptiy 4 
ihur. ftB ^i 0£rv . 3 'Ensrli-she 


Physics 1 


French 3 4 


Ped. 1,2 


Geology 2 


Biology 1 


Geology 4 


German 4 


Chemistry 4 


History 3, 4 Geology 6 


History 2 


Math. 7 


History 7 


Biology 6 


Pedagogy 3, 4 Math C, 8 


German 3 






Chemistry 7 


Math. 4 Elem Law 
Greek 


English 4 




Chemistry 8 


Latin. 1, ill French 1,11 


Eng. 1,1, II Math. I,IV 


LatinTH 


Laboratory ; 
Chem. 1, V 


Math. 1. 1 II History 1, 1 


Geology 1 i French 1 , 1 


Greek 1, 1 


Philosophy 3 Greek 2 


Math 2,1 iHistoryl, H 


Math. 1, III 


Biology 1. 1 


Biology 3 iFrench 2 


Economics 1 Chemistry 1 


German 1,11 Biology 2 


Physics 4 Chemistry 2 


German 2 Math 3 Math. 2, II [Chemistry 3 


tY, T Greek 5, 10 jPhilosoptiy 4 
j Latin 7, 8 Geology 6 


Physics 2 Latin 5, 4 iPed. 1,2 Chemistry 4 


English 5 History 5 [Philosophy 2jBiology 6 


History 10 Math. 0, 8 
English 11 ; Latin 0,0 


French 5 Greek '4 German 4 iChemistry 7 


Math. 5 English 9 


History 7 (Chemistry 8 


Math. 14 El. Law. 


Greek 7 Math. 9 




English 12 




q,_ Biology 3 JBiologyI,II 


Biology 1 , II 1 Biology 1, II 


Biology 1. II 


DA1, Geology Biology 5 


B'o'ogy 5 'Biology 5 Biology is 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



71 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS. 



First Day. Second Day. Third Day. Fourth Day. Fifth Day. 



English 1 
Geology 1 
Math. 2 
German 2 
Economics 1 
English 5 
French 5 
Math. 5 
Greek -7 
Latin 10 



Greek 1 
Math. 1 
German 1 
Math 2 
Pedagogy 1, 2 
Philosophy 2 
German 4 
Chemistry 5 
Biology 6 
History 7 
English 8 



English 3 
Physics 5 
Pedagogy 5 
History 6 



French 1 
History 1 
Chemistry 1 
Math. 3 
Latin 4, 5 
Greek 4 
Economics 3 
History 5 
Pedagogy 6 
English 9 
Math. 9 
English 12 



Latin 1 
English 2 
Physics 2 
Greek 3 
; English 14 



Sixth Day. Seventh Day. Eighth Day. Ninth Day. Tenth Day. 



French 1 
History 1 
Greek 2 
French 2 
Chemistry 2 
Philosophy 4 
Latin 6, 9 
Math. 6, 8 
Geology 6 
English 6 
Elem. Law 



Greek 1 
English 1 
Latin 2 
Physics 1 
Biology 1 
History 2 
Geology 2 
German 3 
English 4 
Chemistry 6 



Physics, Elem. 
Latin 2 
Philosophy 1 
Economics 2 
French 4 
Geology 4 
English 7 
Math. 7 
Chemistry 7 
Greek 9 
English 13 



I Latin 3 
Biology 3 
Philosophy 3 
Physics 4 
Greek 5, 10 
Latin 7, 8 
History 10 
English 11 
Math. 14 



Latin 1 
Math. 1 
German 1 
Spanish 1 
English 2 
Physics 3 
Geology 3 
History 3, 4 
Pedagogy 3, 
Math. 4 
Biology 5 
Greek 6 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., President. 

JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, LL.D., Dean and Professor of Common 

and Statute Law and Equity. 
THOMAS RUFFIN, D.C.L., Associate Professor of Law and Equity. 
KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Professor of Constitutional History 

and International Law. 
CHARLES LEE RAPER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and 

of History. 
CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Medico-Legal 

Jurisprudence . 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Law Department provides three courses of study, each extending 
over a period of one College year. Instruction is given by means of text- 
books, the study of leading cases, and moot courts. Special lectures are 
given by resident instructors and by members of the bar upon subjects of 
interest to students. 

Professor MacRae and Associate Professor Ruffin. 
1. Elementary course in first principles and plain rules of business, con- 
tract and property law. Robinson's Elementary Law. Spencer's 
Commercial Law. Three hours a week. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors in all Academic courses. This 
Course affords a preliminary study for those intending to enter the 
regular law class after graduation, and also an opportunity to 
learn principles and forms applicable to commercial and other bus- 
iness life. It will be of great service to young men about to enter 
into any business. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 73 

FIRST YEAR. 

2. Ewell's Essentials. This Course covers the four books of Blackstoue, 

embracing the subjects of Domestic Relations, (Manning's Com- 
mentaries,) Real and Personal Property Law, Pleading and Prac- 
tice and Criminal Law, Clark on Contracts, Bigelow on Torts. 

3. Greenleaf on Evidence, with the Code Chapter on Evidence. Bis- 

pham's Equity. Clark on Corporations. Schouler on Executors, 
with the Code chapters on Widows, Wills and Testaments. De- 
scent and Executors and Administrators. The Code of North Car- 
olina, including Clark's Code of Civil Procedure. The Constitu- 
tion of the United States and of North Carolina. Sharswood's 
Legal Ethics. 

Courses 2 and 3 include the work prescribed by the Supreme Court of 
North Carolina to be done by candidates for license to practice law, 
and is subject to such changes as may become necessary by reason 
of changes made by the Supreme Court. 

Second Yeae. 

4. Lawson on Bailments. Norton on Notes and Bills. Dillon on Munic- 

ipal Corporations. Burdick on Sales. Huffcut on Agency. Rich- 
ards on Insurance. Clark's Criminal Law. Black's Constitution- 
al Law. Lectures. Theses. 

Other text-books covering the same ground may be substituted for 
those named. 

Professor Battle. 

5. Constitutional History and International Law. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

6. Economics 1 and 2. 

Professor Mangum. 

7. Medico-legal Jurisprudence. One hour a week. 

Courses 4, 5 and 6 are required of all candidates for the degree of 
LL.B. 



EXAMINATIONS. 



Thorough written examinations are held regularly throughout the year 



74 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

on the completion of each subject. A certificate is granted to students who 
pass with credit on all subjects embraced in Courses 2 aud 3. Those who 
receive this certificate are considered ready to appear before the Supreme 
Court for examination. 



SPECIAL LECTURES. 



From time to time during the term, lectures will be delivered before the 
school by eminent judges and lawyers. 



THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 



The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred by the University 
upon candidates who have completed courses 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, and have 
passed all examinations with credit. Two years of residence are ordinari- 
ly required of all students who desire to offer themselves as candidates for 
the degree. Every candidate must submit a thesis on some subject select- 
ed by the senior Professor of Law. Applicants for the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws must be twenty years of age, and must have completed an academ- 
ic course equivalent to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years in the 
College. 

MOOT COURT. 



The Moot Court is an important factor in legal educational methods; it 
familiarizes the student with the practical side of law. It is the purpose 
of the University Court to acquaint the student with the legal details so 
necessary to be acquired, yet so difficult of access. Regular sessions are 
held every Saturday night, and every student in the Law School has fre- 
quent opportunities for practice. The work is thorough and is carried on 
from the inception of the suit to the final judgment in the Appellate Court. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 76 

Court of Appeals. 
Judge, Professor MacRae. 





Superior Court. 


Judge, 


Associate Professor Ruffin. 


Solicitor. 


, F. M. Wooten. 


Clerk, 


Nathan Lunsford. 


Sheriff, 


R. L. Godwin. 



EXPENSES PER TERM. 

Tuition fee 137.50 

Registration and Incidental fees. . . 10.00 
Tuition fee for Elementary Course 5.00 

Where full tuition, $37.50, is paid, students may also take the Element- 
ary Course if it is desired. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Law School should present themselves 
on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for admission into 
the College, either in September or in January. Candidates for admission 
and students already members of the school are expected to register ac- 
cording to the regulations on page 63. The session of the Law School is of 
the same length as the College year. The members of the Law School en- 
joy all the privileges extended to other students in the University. 

SUMMER SCHOOL OF LAW. 

During the summer two classes in law are conducted by the professors 
of this department. The text-books used are the same as those required in 



76 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Courses 2 and 3, prescribed by the Supreme Court. The summer session begins 
on the tenth day of June, 1903, and ends on the Friday before the last Mon- 
day in August. The fee for admission into either Course is thirty dollars for 
tuition and three dollars for registration; for admission into both Courses, 
fifty dollars for tuition and three dollars for registration. The tuition is 
|30 for both Courses to students who have attended the regular session for 
two terms and to licensed attorneys desiring to review the principles of the 
Law. 

All fees are payable in advance. 



THE DEPAKTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., President. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., Dean of the Department. 

at Chapel Hill and Professor of Anatomy and Pathology . 
CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Materia Med- 

■ ica and. Instructor in Anatomy. 
ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., Professor of Physiology and Instructoi 

in Bacteriology. 
HUBERT ASHLEY ROYSTER, A.B., M.D., Dean of the Department at 

Raleigh and Professor of Gynecology. 
WISCONSIN ILLINOIS ROYSTER, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON KNOX, M.D., Prof essor of Surgery . 
RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Eye 

and Lecturer on General Hygiene. 
KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Jr., A.B-, M.D., Professor of Diseases of 

the Ear, Nose and Throat. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 
*HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 
CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
JAMES EDWIN DUERDEN, Ph.D., A.R.C.S.(Lond.), Acting Professor 

of Biology. 
ALVIN' SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic 

Chemistry. 
WILLIAM CHAMBERS COKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
ANDREW WATSON -GOODWIN, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 

and Diseases of the Skin. 
HENRY MoKEE TUCKER, M.D., Lecturer on Obstetrics and Diseases of 

Children. 
JAMES WILLIAM McGEE, Jr., M.D., Chief of Dispensary . 

♦Absent on leave, 1902-03. 



78 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

ROBERT SHERWOOD McGEACHY, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery 
and Gynecology. 

*JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., Instructor in Physics. 

JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

CLARENCE ALBERT SHORE, S.M., Instructor in Biology. 

WILLIAM DeBERNIERE MacNDDER, Demonstrator of Clinical Pathol- 
ogy- 

MARSHALL CRAPON GUTHRIE, Jr., Assistant in Anatomy. 

WILLIAM MONCURE, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Dispensary. 

IVEY FOREMAN LEWIS, A.B., Assistant in Biology. 



FOUNDATION. 

Instruction in Medicine is given in two distinct schools, one situated at the 
seat of the University, the other in the city of Raleigh. The Department 
at Chapel Hill furnishes thoroughly good instruction in the fundament- 
al branches of Medicine — those branches which constitute the scientific 
basis of the actual practice of medicine and surgery, which should be 
taught in the first two years of the medical curriculum. The school pos- 
sesses exceptional advantages for this work. There is an adequate corps of 
trained and faithful instructors; there are good laboratories for the various 
branches of study; the students live in the environment of a University, 
and enjoy all the advantages it gives to young men; above all, the classes 
are necessarily small, so that the methods of instruction demanded by 
modern educational ideals are carried on with comparative ease. More- 
over, all the laboratories of the academic department are open to medical 
students, as well as the courses of instruction offered by the departments 
of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. 

The School has received the endorsement of the State Medical Society. 
No student who has successfully completed the course has been rejected 
by the State Board of Medical Examiners, a statement which gains force 
from the fact that the majority of the subjects upon which that Board con- 
ducts examinations are completed by students during their attendance up- 

• Absent on leave, 1902-03. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 79 

on this School. The School was founded in 1890; in 1898 it was admitted 
to membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges; recently 
it has been incorporated as an integral part of the University on the 
same footing as the graduate and other professional schools. 

The instruction of the third and fourth years is conducted at Raleigh 
with all the hospital and clinical advantages of a city. This School is in- 
tended to receive the student after the completion of the course at Chapel 
Hill in the more fundamental elements of scientific medical education. 



THE DEPARTMENT AT CHAPEL HILL. 

THE GENERAL PLAN OP INSTRUCTION. 

For the course of instruction provided by the Medical School all those ad- 
vantages are claimed which are derived from good equipment and small 
classes. Bach student has the opportunity of seeing the various demon- 
strations and experiments, and receives direct personal instruction . The 
course extends over a period of two College years, and its successful com- 
pletion entitles students to entrance into the third year of high-grade 
medical colleges. 

In the arrangement of the courses of study the attempt is made to follow 
what would seem to be their natural sequence. In the first year the student 
devotes most of his time to anatomical and chemical studies. The study of 
Gross and Microscopic Anatomy proceed side by side. In the spring, by 
which time the student has obtained sufficient knowledge of Chemistry and 
Anatomy, the study of Physiology is begun. In the second year the study 
of Anatomy and Physiology is continued. The work in Chemistry is lab- 
oratory in character, is devoted to Qualitative Analysis, Physiological 
Chemistry and Toxicology, and continues throughout the year. Pathology 
is taken up at the beginning of this year, and continued for nine months . 
Materia Medica is begun in the spring term, after the course in Physiology 
has been completed. In this year also the class practices the exercises in 
Minor Surgery. 

It is yet necessary to continue courses in Physics and General Chemistry 

6 



80 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

for the benefit of those students who have not had the advantages of ade- 
quate instruction in those subjects; but all are advised to pursue these 
courses before entering the Medical School. Students who have had 
courses in Physics and Chemistry are advised to elect General Biology and 
Embryology during the first and second years of their study of medicine. 

The majority of the work in most of the branches is carried on in the 
laboratories. Lectures are not neglected, and the value of a good text-book 
is appreciated; but it is deemed very desirable that the student should be 
brought face to face with nature, so that he will not merely acquire facts, 
but the powers of observation and judgment so essential to physicians, will 
be stimulated and encouraged. 

The course is arrangedintwo sessions of nine months each, as follows: — 

First Year. 

Physics. Three hours a week, fall term. 
Chemistry. Fours hours a week throughout the year. 
Histology. Five hours a week throughout the year. 
Anatomy. Eight hours a week for first seven months. 
Physiology. Three hours a week, spring term. 

Second Year. 

Chemistry. Laboratory work six hours a week throughout the year. 

Anatomy. Six hours a week for five months. 

Bacteriology. Six hours a week, fall term. 

Physiology. Five hours a week, fall term. 

Pathology. Eight hours a week, spring term. 

Materia Medica. Five hours a week, spring term. 

Minor Surgery. Three hours a week for six weeks. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Physics. 

Dr. Mills. 
1. Elementary course. The fundamental facts of physics presented, and 
the general laws illustrated by experiments. 



THE UNrVERSTT IRECORD 81 

Chemistry. 

Professor Baskerville, Dr. Mills and Mr. Davis. 

1 . General Descriptive Chemistry. 

The elements are taken tip in their order and described. This study 
is followed by the laws of combination and the compounds formed. 
The latter part of the course is taken up with organic chemistry. 

Associate Professor Wheeler and Mr. Davis. 

9. Qualitative Analysis and Toxicology. Laboratory work with lectures. 

Second year, (the first five and a half months). 

This course supplements the lectures given by Professor Maugum on 
Toxicology. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

10. Physiological Chemistry including Urine Analysis. Lectures and 

laboratory work. Second year, (the last three and a half months) . 

Biology. 

In the biological courses some record of each day's work is kept by the 
student. This record consists chiefly of the sketches made directly from 
the dissection or the preparations under the microscope. The importance 
of making a figure (even a poor one) of the object under study, cannot be 
overestimated as an aid to observation. In addition to the usual written 
examinations, practical examinations on the work done in the laboratory 
are held. 

Professor Duerden. 

1. General Biology. 

Representative types of the great groups of organisms are dissected 
and studied microscopically. The forms range on the one side 
from the unicellular animals to the vertebrates, and on the other 
from the unicellular plants to the phanerogams. In the lectures 
the forms to be studied are briefly described, their relations are 
pointed out, and the principles which they illustrate are explained. 
The fundamental facts concerning living things are thus learned 
directly from nature in such a way as to develop the power of ac- 
curate observation, skill in handling instruments, and method in 
the recording of notes. Elective in the first year. 

3. Vertebrate Histology. 

The principal tissues and organs of the vertebrate body are here 



82 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

studied according to the methods of modern microscopy. The in- 
dividual student is instructed how to make, study, and sketch 
microscopic preparations, including paraffin and celloidin sections, 
macerations, and mounts of fresh tissue. 

6. Vertebrate Embryology. 

The main facts in the development of a vertebrate animal are here 
worked out by the student for himself with the aid of explanatory 
lectures. A brief survey of the early stages of development, in- 
cluding maturation, fertilization, segmentation, and formation of 
the germ layers is first made upon lower forms (nematode, starfish, 
teleost, frog) . The development of the typical vertebrate organs 
is then studied in chick embryos. Elective in second year. 



Anatomy. 

Professors Whitehead and Mangum and Mr. Guthrie. 

The method of instruction is one of dissection and demonstration 
rather than of lectures. In the first year the body is studied by 
systems, first the bones, then the muscles, etc. The student does 
much of the dissecting for himself, but the more difficult dissec- 
tions are made by the instructor. Frequent practical examinations 
are held, upon which stress is laid, in order to enforce proper 
study of the cadaver. In the second year the study proceeds by 
regions. The student does all the dissecting, but is stiD under the 
supervision of an instructor, who examines him upon the work 
done, and indicates the bearing of anatomical facts upon surgical 
operations. During this year there is a special laboratory study of 
the anatomy of the central nervous system. 
Elective, three hours per week, to Seniors in all Academic courses. 

Physiology. 

Professor Manning. 

The study of Physiology is begun in the spring term of the first year, 
instruction being given by means of lectures and recitations illlus- 
trated by experiments. The study is continued in the fall term of 
the second year, during which the student learns the methods of 
Experimental Physiology by means of class work in the laboratory. 

Elective, one hour and a half per week, to Seniors in all Academic 
courses. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 83 

Materia Medica. 

Professor Mangum. 

This Course is devoted to the study of the geographical and botanical 
sources of drugs, their chemical constitution, preparations and 
doses, physiological action, and, to some extent, the indications for 
their rational use. Opportunity will he given to students to famil- 
iarize themselves with the more important crude drugs and their 
preparations. Instruction is given by means of lectures, recita- 
tions and demonstrations. The lectures intended to accompany 
the work in Toxicology are given as a part of the course in Materia 
Medica. 

Pathology. 

Professors Whitehead and Manning. 

1. Bacteriology. The student learns by practical experience the methods 

of cultivating, staining and identifying the principal bacteria, the 
pathological significance of which is explained by lectures and 
demonstrated by inoculation of animals. In this way the chief 
■ bacteria are studied in pure culture, after which the methods of 
obtaining pure cultures from mixtures of bacteria are learned. 
The necessary manipulations are all carried on by the student, 
who thus obtains a useful practical knowledge of the subject. 

2. Pathological Histology. Here the various changes which may be pro- 

duced in the tissues as the result of disease are discussed in lectures 
and studied with the microscope. The laboratory is especially well 
provided with pathological material, and each student stains, 
mounts and studies a large number of sections extending over al- 
most the whole range of pathology, upon which he is required to 
stand practical examinations. 

Minor Surgery. 

Professor Mangum. 

The class practices the application of bandages and the modern meth- 
ods of dressing wounds. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Elementary Pharmacy. 

Professor Howell. 

An elective course in Pharmacy is offered embracing the simpler 
pharmaceutical operations. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

In accordance with the rules of the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges, of which association this School is a member, students desiring to 
matriculate will be required, except under the circumstances noted here- 
after, to pass the following entrance examination: 

1. In English, a composition on some subject of general interest, which 
must be written by the applicant at the time of examination, and must con- 
tain at least two hundred words. 

2. In Arithmetic, such questions as will show a thorough knowledge of 
common and decimal fractions, compound numbers, ratio and proportion. 

3. In Algebra, questions covering the fundamental operations, factor- 
ing, and simple quadratic equations. 

4. In Latin an examination upon such elementary work as the student 
may offer showing a familiarity usually attained by one year of study. 

In place of this examination or any part of it, the official certificates of 
high schools will be accepted. 

Students who are unable to pass the above entrance examinations, may 
matriculate provided they are not deficient in more than one subject. The 
deficiencies must be made up before entering the second year. For 
such deficient students instruction will be provided without additional 
tuition fees. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

The Harris Prize. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. T. W. Harris offers, 
in honor of the late Dr. T. W. Harris, a pocket case of instruments to that 
student who shall make the best grade in Anatomy. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. Mary Sprunt 



THE UNIVERSITY HECOKD 85 

Wood, of Wilmington, has founded, in memory of her late husband, Dr. 
Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value of ninety dollars. 



EXPENSES. 

The following are the charges per term payable at the beginning of each 
term: — 

Tuition $37.50 

Registration and incidental fees 10.00 

In addition there is a fee of $1.25 for first year students. There are 
small fees in embryology and histology for those taking these courses. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Medical School should present them- 
selves on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for admis- 
sion into the College. Candidates for admission and students already mem- 
bers of the School are expected to register on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednes- 
day, September 7, 8 or 9, 1903, and Saturday, Monday or Tuesday, January 2, 
4 or 5, 1904. The session of the Medical School is of the same length as 
the college year. 

All members of the Medical School enjoy the same privileges as other 
students in the University. 



THE DEPARTMENT AT RALEIGH. 

LOCATION AND FACILITIES. 

The advantages afforded by the city of Raleigh for the advanced work 
of the University Medical School are numerous. It is the most accessible 
of the State's larger cities and has already become one of its educational 
centres. Comprising, with the suburbs, a population of 26,000, it offers 



86 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

clinical facilities second to none in North Carolina. Two hospitals will ad- 
mit students of the Medical College for instruction. These hos- 
als are attended by the Faculty of the College and special care will be given 
to individual teaching with the varied material found in them. Beside 
these hospitals, there are many available public institutions which furnish 
valuable privileges to the students of the University. 

The course is arranged for two sessions of nine mouths each, known as 
the third and fourth years, as follows: 

Third Year. 

Medicine. Four hours a week throughout the year. 
Surgery. Four hours a week throughout the year. 
Obstetrics. Three hours a week throughout the year. 
Physical Diagnosis. One hour a week, fall term. 
Hygiene. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Clinical Pathology. One hour a week throughout the year. 
Dispensary. Seven hours a week throughout the year. 

Fourth Year. 

Medicine. Four hours a week throughout the year. 

Surgery. Four hours a week throughout the year. 

Gynecology. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Pediatrics. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Diseases of the Eye. Two hours a week throughout the year. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat. Two hours a week throughout 

the year. 

Dermatology. One hour a week, spring term. 

Dispensary. Seven hours a week throughout the year. 

These include the weekly clinics and ward classes, by means of 
which students receive thorough, individual, practical instruc- 
tion. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Medicine. 

Professor W. I. Royster and Dr. Goodwin. 

This subject is taught by didactic lectures, ward classes and general 



THE UNIVERSITY RECOED 87 

clinics. The study of Therapeutics is included and instruction in 
the two subjects is closely combined. 

Third Year. The Infectious Diseases, Diseases of the Blood and the 

Digestive System. 

Special attention is given to individual instruction in the methods 
of physical diagnosis. 

Fourth Year. Diseases of the Respiratory System, Heart and Kidneys. 
The General Diseases. Diseases of the Nervous System and of the 
Skin. Weekly clinics and ward classes. * 

Surgery. 

Professor Knox and Dr. McGeachy. 

Third Year. The Principles of Surgery, Wounds, Minor Operations 

and Bandaging. 

Ward classes and Dispensary work will furnish ample demonstra- 
tions of the subjects described in the lectures. 

Fourth Year. The General Practice of Surgery. The Major Opera- 
tions. The Genito-Urinary and Venereal Diseases. 

At all the clinics students will be able, by direct personal observa- 
tion at short range, to witness every step of an operation and thus 
familiarize themselves with the details. 

Obstetrics. 

Dr. Tucker, Lecturer. 
Third Year. Lectures, recitations and clinical experience. Fundamental 
obstetric principles receive the closest attention. 

A number of maternity cases are available for instructing students 
in the management of labor and the lying-in period. 

Gynecology. 

Professor H. A. Royster and Dr. McGeachy. 
Fourth Year. Lectures covering the entire field of diseases of women 



88 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

from the simplest procedure to the more serious operations. Illus- 
trative clinics held weekly. 

Practice in pelvic examinations will be given constantly to each in- 
dividual student, with the object of enabling him to make correct 
gynecological diagnoses. 

Diseases of the Eye. 

Professor Lewis. 

Fourth Year. Lectures with clinics and dispensary classes. 

A thorough course is furnished as an absolute essential for the gen - 
eral practitioner. Mastery of the principles is insisted upon. An 
abundance of illustrative material is presented in clinics and dis- 
pensary classes. 



Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat. 

Professor Battle. 
Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations with opportunities for in- 
vestigating cases under direct supervision. 

A knowledge of these diseases is recognized as necessary for every 
physician. Particular care is devoted to personal demonstration. 

Diseases of Children. 

Dr. Tucker, Lecturer. 
Fourth Year. Lectures and bed-side demonstrations. Special empha- 
sis will be given to the diagnosis and treatment of the infectious 
diseases and to the care of infants. 

General Hygiene. 

Professor Lewis, Lecturer. 

Third Year. The principles and laws of hygiene and sanitation and the 

most approved practical methods established by modern science. 

A knowledge of hygiene and sanitation is very necessary for physi- 
cians in every community. Extraordinary oportunities will be 
given for investigating the workings of sanitary regulations. 



THE UNrVTESITY RECORD 89 

THE CITY FREE DISPENSARY. 



Dr. McGee, Physician in Chief. 
Dr. Moncure, Assistant. 

By special arrangement, the city of Raleigh has allowed the establish- 
ment of a Free Dispensary, to which all the outdoor city patients are to 
come for treatment. Thus every possible case may be utilized as clinical 
material for students of the University. Here will be found unusual priv- 
ileges of personal observation. At certain times each student may conduct 
the dispensary work on his own account under the direction of the instruc- 
tors. 

DEGREE. 



The degree of Doctor of Medicine will be conferred by the Board of 
Trustees upon students who are recommended for graduation by the 
Faculty. Candidates must have devoted at least four full years to the 
study of medicine and the fourth year, at least, must have been taken in 
this school, the other three in this or other recognized schools of medicine. 
Candidates must have passed satisfactoiy examinations in all subjects re- 
quired for the degree. 

EXPENSES. 

The following are the charges per term, payable at the beginning of each 
term: — 

Tuition 132.50 

Registration 5.00 

There are no other fees. Board may be obtained in the city at from 
$12.50 to $15.00 per month. 

ADMISSION. 

Students will be admitted to the Medical School at Raleigh upon com- 



90 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

pletion of the preparatory two years' course at the University, or its equiv- 
alent. Preliminary examinations will be required, if deemed necessary. 

Students may be admitted to advanced standing who present evidence of 
having fulfilled the requirements of this School with respect to preliminary 
education, and of having completed at accredited medical schools satisfac- 
tory courses in the studies of the preceding year or years. 

REGISTRATION. 

Students should present themselves for registration on Monday, Tuesday 
or Wednesday, September 7, 8 or 9, 1903, and on Saturday, Monday or Tues- 
day, January 2, 4 or 5, 1904. 






THE DEPAETMENT OF PHAEMACY. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., President. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Dean and Professor of 
Pharmacy. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, O.E., Professor of Physics. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

*HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Materia 
Medica. 

ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., Professor of Physiology. 

JAMES EDWIN DUERDEN, Ph.D., A.R.C.S. (Lond.), Acting Profes- 
sor of Biology. 

ALVEN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic 
Chemistry. 

WILLIAM CHAMBERS COKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

*JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M.., Instructor in Physics. 

JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

CLARENCE ALBERT SHORE, S.M., Instructor in Biology. 

WILLIAM MORGAN PERRY, Assistant in the Pharmaceutical Labor- 
atory. 

ROY ALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

IVEY FOREMAN LEWIS, A.B., Assistant in Biology. 



FOUNDATION. 

The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1897 and was opened 
for students in September of that year. Its location at the seat of the Uni- 
versity assures to its students the most modern scientific instruction with 

* Absent on leave, 1902-03. 



92 THE UNTVERSIEY RECORD 

all the laboratory facilities of the academic department, as well as the 
courses of instruction in allied branches. These opportunities will meet 
the requirements of the large number of students who were compelled 
heretofore to obtain their pharmaceutical education in other States. 
Briefly stated, the advantages are as follows : 

1. Thorough, careful, individual instruction. 

2. The practical experience derived from active work in the laboratories. 

3. Intimate association with the other departments of the University, to 
all of which the student of pharmacy has access, and the daily contact with 
students pursuing various branches of learning. 

4. The use of the large library and reading room and the well-equipped 
gymnasium. 

5. The comparatively small cost at which a two-years' course may be 
obtained. 

6. The course here consists of two sessions of nine months each, — nearly 
a fourth longer than in many of the Colleges of Pharmacy. 

The success of the students of this department in their examinations 
before the State. Boards has been very gratifying. Students of this depart- 
ment have been applicants before the State Boards of Maryland , Pennsyl- 
vania and North Carolina. None of the graduates of this department 
applying for license before State Boards, have failed to pass the examin- 
ations. 

ARRANGEMENT OP COURSES. 



The courses are arranged for two sessions of nine months each, and lead 
to the degree of Graduate of Pharmacy (Ph.G.). 

First Year. 

The instruction includes: — 

Theory and Practice of Pharmacy, Practical Course in Operative Phar- 
macy, Elementary Physics, Descriptive Chemistry, Physiology (optional), 
Lectures in Pharmaceutical Botany. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 93 

Second Year. 

The instruction includes: — 

Theory and Practice of Pharmacy, Practical Course in Operative Phar- 
macy, General Biology (optional), Materia Medica and Toxicology, Quali- 
tative Analysis, Urinary Analysis. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Pharmacy. 

Professor Howell. 

1. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. First year. Five hours a week. 

This Course consists of lectures upon the following subjects, with 
practical demonstration and the employment of proper apparatus 
whenever necessary: 

Metrology: comminution, heat, evaporation, distillation, sublima- 
tion. 

Fusion: calcination, granulation, oxidation, reduction, etc. 

Solution: of solids, liquids and gases, deliquescence, efflorescence, 
etc. 

Colation: filtration, decolorization, clarification, precipitation, etc. 

Maceration: expression, infusion, decoction, etc. 

Percolation, and the preparation and study of the following: waters, 
syrups, honeys, glycerites, mucilages, mixtures, spirits, elixirs, 
liniments, collodions, tinctures, wines, vinegars and fluid extracts. 

2. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. Second Year. Five hours a week. 

The official forms and preparations of drugs are taken up in detail. 
Beginning with the inorganic compounds, the salts are considered 
with regard to their commercial qualities and pharmaceutical uses 
and preparations. The organic compounds are studied, commenc- 
ing with the salts of the organic acids and passing to the natural 
and organic compounds. 

8. Lectures on Pharmaceutical Botany. Two hours a week (spring term.) 

This Course is preparatory to the study of Materia Medica, and takes 
up the study of the flower, the various topics of fruits, seeds, etc., 
and a careful study of the descriptive terms as applied to leaves, 
stems and roots. Instruction is given in the gathering and pro- 
per mounting of specimens of the various official herbs that grow 
in this vicinity. 



94 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Materia Medica and Toxicology. 

Professors Howell and Mangum. 

1 . Materia Mediea Lectures on the geographical and botanical sources 

of drugs, descriptions and uses of the same, together with their 

physical and toxic effects. Tliree hours a week. 

Opportunity is given to the student to familiarize himself with most 
of the crude drugs and their preparations. 

2. Toxicology. Lectures on poisons and their specific action on the va- 

rious parts of the body in their minimum and maximum doses. 
Three hours a week. 

Attention is called to the symptoms exhibited in cases of poisoning, 
to the mode of action of chemical antidotes and physiological an- 
tagonistics, and to the relative values of mechanical treatments. 

Physics. 

Dr. Mills. 
1. Elementary course. The fundamental facts of physics presented and 
the general laws illustrated by experiment. Three hours a nvek 
(fall term.) 

Chemistry. 

Professor Baskerville, Dr. Mills and Mr. Davis. 
1. Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures with laboratory work. A study of 
the elements and their compounds, including an introduction to 
organic chemistry. Three hours a week. 

Associate Professor Wheeler and Mr. Davis. 

9. Qualitative Analysis and Toxicology. Laboratory work with lectures. 

Three hours a week (five and a half months.) . Second year. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

10. Physiological Chemistry, including Urine Analysis. Lectures and 

laboratory work. Three hours a week. (Three and a half months.) 
Second year. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 95 

The following courses are not required of students in Pharmacy but may- 
be elected profitably: 

Physiology. 

Professor Manning. 

1. Lectures, laboratory work and demonstrations. Three hours a week 

(spring term). 

A brief but practical study is made of the skeleton, joints, muscles, 
heart, blood-vessels, brain, eye, ear and viscera. Demonstrations 
are given of the blood-flow in the capillaries, phenomena of reflex 
action and microscopic structure of the chief tissues. 

Biology. 

Professor Duerden. 
1. General Biology. Fundamental principles worked out in selected an- 
imal and plant types. Lectures and laboratory work. Five hours 
a week. 

Botany. 

Associate Professor Coker. 

9. General introduction to Systematic Botany, with special attention to 
medicinal plants. Laboratory and field work with recitations. 
Three hours a ireek (spring term). 
Open to students of Pharmacy only. 

Prescription Filling. 

Professor Howell. 

In order that students may gain experience in prescription filling, a course 
in the practical "every day work" of a drug store and in selling 
poisons and filling prescriptions is given. The prescriptions se- 
lected are those that will give the largest amount of practical ex- 
7 






96 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

perience. For this course a fee of ten dollars is required to cover 
the cost of ingredients, bottles, labels, etc. 



OPTIONAL COURSES. 



The following optional courses may be taken on the payment of a small 
laboratory fee to cover cost of materials, etc. 

Industrial Chemistry. Lectures. The application of chemistry to the 

arts and industries. Three hours a week. 

This course includes metallurgy, glass making, pottery, (fall term); 
food, clothing, building materials, explosives, photography, etc., 

(spring term.) 

Agricultural Chemistry. Lectures. Three hours a week (spring term) . 

This course includes the chemistry of the plant and the soil and the 
discussion of plant-food, etc. Many specimens have been collect- 
ed in the Industrial Museum to illustrate these courses. 

Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work. Three or five 

hours a week. 

This course is intended to give the student a thorough grounding in 
\ analytical methods and manipulations. 

Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Three or five hours a week. 

The student in this course is led further into the study and practice 
of analytical methods. The work may take any special direction 
desired by him, fitting him to be an agricultural chemist, iron 
chemist, manufacturing chemist, physician, druggist or teacher 
of chemistry. Encouragement is given to the student to make 
original researches. 

Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures with laboratory work. Dana's 
Text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours a week. 

Bacteriology. 

The student learns by practical experience the methods of cultivat- 
ing, staining and identifying the principal bacteria, and their path- 
ological significance is explained by lectures and demonstrations 
by inoculation of animals. In this way the chief pathogenic bac- 
teria are studied in pure culture on the various media, after which 
the methods of obtaining pure culture from mixtures of bacteria 
are learned. The necessary manipulations are. carried out by the 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 97 

students, who thus obtain a practical knowledge of the subject 
which can be gained in no other way. 

Students in Pharmacy have also the privilege of attending any of 
the regular academic courses. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

All students matriculating in the School of Pharmacy are required to 
pass an examination in the usual rudimentary branches of an English ed- 
ucation. 

Final examinations are held at the end of each term on the subjects em- 
braced in the course. 

An average of 70 per cent, on the intermediate and final examinations is 
required to pass in the various branches. 

quizzes. 

Quizzes upon the different branches are regularly held. Specimen 
quizzes upon Materia Medica, Chemistry and Pharmacy are held once a 
week, and consist in the recognition and correct writing of the official 
name of the specimen presented. 

Students are required to make an average of 70 per cent, on the examin- 
ations given on specimens at the close of each term. 

THE PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORY. 

Officers. 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph.G., Director and Professor of 

Pharmacy . 
William Morgan Perry, Assistant in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 

The rooms occupied as Pharmaceutical Laboratory are admirably adapt- 
ed to this purpose. They are conveniently situated on the first floor, are 



98 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

well lighted and well equipped with water, electric lights and gas. To 
each student is assigned a desk, provided with lock and key and contain- 
ing all the apparatus necessary to the every day work of a pharmacist . In 
the store room is kept a supply of materials for practical work as well as 
the apparatus for the more complex operations. Ample space is provided 
for work at the prescription counter, where practical instruction in the 
compounding and dispensing of prescriptions is given. 

A small deposit fee is required to cover the cost of breakage of apparatus. 
At the end of the session this amount will be returned, less the amount of 
breakage occurring during the term. 



OTHER LABORATORIES. 



The laboratories of Physics, Chemistry and Biology are open to students 
in Pharmacy. These laboratories are all equipped with the most improved 
apparatus for experimentation and illustration of lectures. 



READING ROOM AND LIBRARY. 



The Pharmaceutical Department is provided with a well selected lib- 
rary and with a reading room, inaugurated by the class of 1897, in which 
are filed a large number of medical and pharmaceutical journals. 

In addition to these advantages, students of this department enjoy the 
privileges of the University reading room, in which are filed all the leading 
newspapers and magazines, and free access to the University Library, 
which numbers forty thousand volumes and twenty thousand pamphlets. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

Every person upon whom the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy of this 
University shall be conferred, must have completed the work of both years 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 99 

in the Department of Pharmacy of this University, or one course (that of 
the second year) here after one in some recognized college of Pharmacy. 
He must obtain satisfactory marking in attendance and make a general 
average of 70 per cent, in the various branches, and submit a satisfactory 
thesis. 

He must also have had a practical experience of at least four years with 
some qualified pharmacist or pharmacists in a dispensing store. Satisfac- 
tory evidence on this point must be submitted to the head of the depart- 
ment. 

Students who have not had the full four years' experience will be per- 
mitted to stand examinations for graduation; but their diplomas will be 
withheld until they shall have satisfied this requirement. 

No person will be entitled to a diploma until his dues to the University 
have been paid. 

THESES. 

The thesis must be an original essay embodying the results of the stu- 
dent's personal research in some branch of pharmacy, which he has prose- 
cuted under the direction of the professor who has assigned him the sub- 
ject. The thesis will be published at the discretion of the professor. The 
thesis, together with certificate of time of practical experience, must be de- 
posited with the Registrar on. or before Mai/ 1. 

PHIZES. 

The Bradham Prize, offered by C. D. Bradham, of Newbern, N. C, will 
be given to the student making the highest general average during the two 
years of study. 

The Gilpin Langdon Prize, offered by Gilpin Langdon & Co., of Balti- 
more, Md., will be given to the student making the best line of prepara- 
tions in the pharmaceutical laboratory. 

Prizes will also be given: 

1. For the best thesis. 

2. For the best collection of native medicinal herbs. 



100 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

3. For the best exhibit of chemical salts made by a second year student. 

4. For the best work in the recognition of materia medica specimens. 

5. To the student recognizing the largest number of pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

EXPENSES. 

The charges of each term are payable at the beginning of the term. 
They are as follows: 

Tuition $30.00 

Registration and incidental fees . . . 10.00 
For Chemistry 1 there is a fee of $1.25; for Chemistry 9 and 10, a fee of 
$5.00. In the Prescription Course there is a fee of $5.00. 

The payment of these fees entitles the student to the use of the gym- 
nasium, the library and reading room and, in case of sickness, to medical 
attention and the use of the infirmary. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 



Candidates for admission into the School of Pharmacy should present 
themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for 
admission into the College. For the next academic year, these days will 
be Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday, September 7, S or 9, 190.1, and Saturday, 
Monday or Tuesday, January 2, 4 or 5, 1904. The session of the School of 
Pharmacy is of the same length as the College year. 

The members of the School of Pharmacy enjoy all the privileges ex- 
tended to other students iu the Uirversity, 



THE SCHOOL OF MINING. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLB, Ph.D., President. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Dean and Professor of Physics.. 
JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B., State Geologist and Lecturer on. Eco- 
nomic Geology and Mining in the Southern Appalachian Region. 
WILLIAM CAIN, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 
COLLIER COBB, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 
CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
*ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
*JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., Instructor in Physics. 
ROYALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.B., Assistant In Chemistry. 
HUGH HAMMOND BENNETT, Assistant in Chemistry. 
HAZEL HOLLAND, Assistant in Chemistry. 

MARVIN HENDRIX STACY, Ph.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
GEORGE PHIFER STEVENS, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics. 
ROBERT GILLIAM LASSITER, Assistant in Geology. 
ROBERT ARTHUR LICHTENTHAELER, S.B., Assistant in Geology. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Mathematics. 

Associate Professor Henderson, Messrs. Stacy and Stevens. 
1. Plane and Solid Geometry from Book IV to end (Wells). Algebra, 
from Quadratics (Wentworth's College Algebra). Four hours a 
week. 

* Absent on leave, W02-03. 



102 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Professor Cain and Associate Professor Henderson. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, with Logarithms (Crockett). An- 

alytic Geometry (Tanner and Allen). Three hours a week. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 

3. Descriptive Geometry (Willsou). Surveying (Raymond). Practice in 

Drawing. Three hours a week. 

Professor Cain. 

9. Mechanics of Materials. Stresses in Bridge and Roof Trusses (Merri- 
man, Johnson, Cain). Three hours a week. 

(See pages 44 and 45.) 

Physics. 

Professor Gore. 

1. Physics. A general course. Lectures with textbooks. Laboratory 

work (with Mr. Latta) . Three hours a week. 

Mr. Latta. 

2. Mechanics, including Statics and Dynamics. Three hours u week. 

Professor Gore. 

3. Heat, heat engines, heating systems, steam boilers, pumps, etc. Three 

hours a week. 

4. Electricity and Magnetism. Dynamos, motors, electric lighting, stor- 

age batteries. Three hours a week. 

7. Polyphase Electric Currents. Electrical transmission of power. Three 
hours a iveek. 

(See pages 46 and 47.) 

Chemistry, Metallurgy and Assaying. 

Professor Baskerville. 
1. Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. A study 
of the elements and their compounds, including an introduction to 
organic chemistry. Laboratory work required. Three hours a 
week. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 103 

2. 'Technical Chemistry, (a) Metallurgy, Mining, Treatment of Ores, 

Smelting, Chlorination, etc. Three hours a week (fall term.) 
(b) Industrial and Agricultural Chemistry. Glass-Making, Cloth- 
ing, Hygiene, etc. Three hours a week (spring term.) 

Associate Professor Wheeler and Mr. Bennett. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work with lectures. Two hours 

a week. 

Associate Professor Wheeler and Dr. Mills. 

4. Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Three hours a week. 

Professor Baskerville. 

8. Quantitative Analysis. Extension of Course 4 in technical lines or 
leading to research. Five times a week. 
(See pages 47 and 48.) 

Geology. 

Professor Cobb. 

1. Elementary Geology. Lectures and recitations with laboratory and 

field work. Three hours a. week. 

2. Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures, with laboratory and field work. 

Two hours a week. 

3. General Critical Geology. Lectures with field work; laboratory work 

on rocks and fossils. Three hours a week. 

4. Economic Geology. Lectures with laboratory and field work. The 

general features and formation of ore deposits of the ores of iron, 
copper, lead, zinc, silver, gold and the lesser metals. Economic 
minerals, soils, water supply. Three howrs a week. 

5. Petrography. Lectures, laboratory work and theses. Two hours a 

week. 

(See page 51.) 

Mining. 

Professor Holmes. 
1. Economic Geology of North Carolina. In these lectures the economic 



104 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

geology of other portions of the Southern Appalachian regi on is 

also discussed. 

i 

2. Mining in the Southern Appalachian Region. These lectures include 

a discussion of gold, silver, coal and iron mining . 

As supplementary to Courses 1 and 2 students are expected to vi sit 
the mining regions described. 

3. Mineral and Ore deposits. Lectures supplemented by laboratory and 

field work. 

4. Principles and Practice in General Mining. Lectures supplemented by 

visits to different mining regions. 

LABORATORIES. 

The Physical, Chemical and Geological laboratories are well equipped 
or thorough work. Several thousand dollars are spent annually for ap- 
paratus and equipment. Special libraries are kept in the laboratories for 
the use of the students. 



RETIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission are received by examination or by certificate. 
Entrance examinations are held in September (see page 26). Students who 
present certificates of work accomplished at preparatory schools or colleges, 
may be admitted without examination, provided that the certificates are 
approved. The right to examine, however, is reserved, when such a course 
is deemed necessary. 

Certificates must be made out on the printed form furnished on appli- 
cation to the Registrar, and must be deposited with that officer, properly 
approved, before the work can be officially credited. 

EXPENSES. 

The University fees and general expenses are, in all respects, the same 
as for students in the academic department. A statement of the fees 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



105 



charged and the general cost of living for a session of nine months at the 
University may be found on pages 60 and 61. 

REGISTRATION. 



Students of the School of Mining should present themselves for regis- 
tration at the same times and places as other students of the University. 
This information may be found on page 63. The session of the School of 
Mining is of the same length as the College year. 



STUDENTS (1902-1903.) 



Graduates. 



NAME. 

Bernard, "William Stanly, 

A.B., 1900. Greek, Latin. 
Coble, Charles Paul, 



YEAR. 

Second, 
Candidate for A.M. 
Second, 



RESIDENCE. 

Greenville. 



A.B., 1901. Latin, English, Pedagogy. 

Crowell, George Henry, 

Ph.B., 1892. History, English, Latin. 

Davis, Royall Oscar Eugene, 



Gilmer's Store. 
Candidate for A.M. Non-resident. 

First, High Point. 

Candidate for A.M. Non-resident. 

Second, Columbia, S. C. 

Ph.B., 1901. Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics. Candidate for Ph.D. 

Drane, Brent Skinner, First, Edenton. 

A.B., 1902. Geology, Chemistry, Physics. Candidate for 8.M. 
Ehringhaus, John Christoph Blucher^ Second, Elizabeth City. 

A.B., 1901. English, Chemistry, History. Candidate for A.M. 

Graves, Louis, First, New York, N. Y. 

A.B., 1902. Philosophy, French. 

Harris, Isaac Foust, Third, New Haven, Conn. 

S.B , 1900. Chemistry, English, History. Candidate for S.M. Non-resident. 
Hewitt, Joseph Henry, First, Mapleton, Va. 

A. B., 1899. Biology, Mathematics, English. Candidate for S.M. Non-resident. 



First, 



Chapel Hill. 



Third, Raleigh. 

Candidate for A.M. Non-resident. 



First, 
First, 



Horney, William Johnson, 

A.B., 1897. A.M., 1899. English. 

Jones, Alice Edwards, 

Ph.B., 1900. Latin, French, English. 

Kluttz, Warren Lawson, 

A.B., 1899. Chemistry. 

Lewis, Ivey Foreman, 

A.B. , 1902. Invertebrate Embryology, French, Botany. 
Lichtenthaeler, Robert Arthur, First, 

S.B., 1902. Chemistry, Geology, Physics. Candidate for S.M. 
McKie, George McFarland, First, Chapel Hill. 

Gradiiate, Emerson School of Oratory. Philosophy, French. 
Myers, William Starr, First, Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1897. Ph.D., .Tolins Hopkins University , 
1900. History, English, German. Candidate for A.M. Non-resident. 

Parris, David Clingman, First, Hillsboro. 

M.D., Atlanta Medical College, Microscopic Technique. 



Salisbury. 

Raleigh. 
Candidate for S.M. 
Winston-Salem. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



107 



Prior, Warren Stebbins, First, 

S.B., 1902. Chemistry, Geology. 

Shore, Clarence Albert, Second, 

S.B., 1901. S.M., 1902. Zoology, Botany, Physiology. 

Smith, James Thomas, First, 

A.B., 1902. Latin, Greek, English. Candidate for A.M. 

Stacy, Marvin Hendrix, First, 
Ph.B., 1902. Mathematics. 

Stevens, George Phifer, First, 

A.B., 1902. Mathematics, Physics, English. Candidate for A.M. 

Stevenson, Eeston, First, Wilmington. 

A.B., 1902. Chemistry, Geology, Economics. Candidate for A.M. 
Williams, Robert Ransom, First, Newton. 

A.B., 1902. Non-resident. 
Wilson, Lotus Round, Fourth, Chapel Hill. 

A.B., 1899. A.M., 1902. German, English. 



Fayette ville, 

Winston-Salem. 

High Point. 
Non-resident. 
Morven. 

Matthews. 





Senior Class. 




Name. 


Coubse. 


Residence. 


Andrews, Graham Harris, 


*Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Bell, Benjamin, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington, 


Bennett, Hugh Hammond, 


Sci. , 


Wadesboro. 


Berkeley, Green Ramsey, 


Arts, 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Best, Benjamin Spencer, 


Arts, 


Quinerly. 


Bridgers, Burke Haywood, 


Phil., 


Wilmington, 


Bynum, Curtis Ashley, 


Arts, 


Lincolnton. 


Calder, Milton, 


Arts, 


Wilmington, 


Carr, William Frederick, 


Phil. , 


Durham. 


Cauble, David Zimri, 


Phil., 


Barkley. 


Clement, Edward Buehler, 


Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Collins, Robert Beatty, 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


Cumming, Preston, 


Phil., 


Wilmington. 


Everett, Reuben Oscar, 


Sci., 


Palmyra. 



*The abbreviations indicate the courses selected by students as follows : Arts, the 
course leading to the degree of A.B. ; Phil., the course leading to the degree of Ph.B. ; 
Sci., the course leading to the degree of S.B. ; Elect., a selection of courses not leading 
to a degree but giving preliminary training for Law, Medicine or Teaching, or special 
instruction in one or more departments as indicated. Mln. indicates election of cours- 
es in the School of Mining. ( 



108 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Farlow, Newton Fernando, 

A.B., Guilford College, 1902, 

Foust, Frank Lee, 

Foust, Thomas Bledsoe, 

Gallaway, Gaston Gilbert, 

Gibson, John Shaw, 

Giles, John Reston, 

Glenn, Marshall Renfro, 

Gold, Thomas Jackson, 

Gordon, William Jones, 

Graham, George Washington, Jr., 

Green, George Jackson, 

a.b., Elon College, 1902, 

Gwyn, Thomas Lenoir, 

Hanes, Frederick Moir, 

Hassell, Francis Sylvester, 

Hawes, Edmund Alexander, Jr., 

Haywood, Alfred Williams, Jr., 

Heard, Willis Otter, 

Herring, Robert Withington, 

Holland, Hazel, 

Holt, Earle Pendleton, 

Horner, James Wiley, 

Huske, Bartholomew Fuller, 

Johnson, Charles Earl, Jr., 

Jones, George Lyle, 

Jones, Harry Murray, 

Judd, Zebulon Vance, 

Kerner, Frank Fleurnoy, 

Lassiter, Robert Gilliam, 

McAden, John Henry, Jr., 

McFadyen, Henry Richard, 

Maddry, Charles Edward, 

Morehead, James Lathrop, 

Morrow, Rufus Clegg, 

Parker, Lester Leonidas, 



Arts, 


Hoyle. 


Sci., 


Graham. 


Phil., 


Winston-Salem 


Phil, 


Mount Airy. 


Sci., 


McColl, S. C. 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Sci.. 


Asheville. 


Phil, 


Pearl. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Sci., 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Suffolk, Va. 


Phil, 


Springdale. 


Phil, 


Winston-Salem 


Arts, 


Williamston. 


Sci., 


Atkinson. 


Arts, 


Haw River. 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Phil, 


Han-ell's Store. 


Sci., 


Charlotte. 


Phil, 


Oak Ridge. 


Phil, 


Henderson. 


Arts, 


Fayette ville. 


A rts-, 


Raleigh. 


Arts, 


Franklin. 


Arts, 


Franklin. 


Phil, 


Enno. 


Arts, 


Kernersville. 


Sci., Min. 


Oxford. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Clarkton. 


Phil, 


Hillsboro. 


Phil, 


Durham. 


Arts, 


Oaks. 


Arts, 


Monroe. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



109 



Pearson, Joseph Edmund, 


Phil., 


Riggsbee. 


Sibley, Guy Clarence, 


Sci., 


Louisville, Ky. 


Skinner, Joshua John, 


Sci., 


Hertford. 


Stevens, Harry Pelham, 


Phil. 


Goldsboro. 


Stewart, Roach Sidney, 


Phil, 


O. K., S. C. 


Tart, Braston Isaiah, 


Arts, 


Dunn. 


Thorpe, James Battle, 


Sci., 


Rocky Mount. 


Tomlinson, Jacob, 


Sci., 


Wilson. 


Turner, Henry Gray, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Walker, Nathan Wilson, 


Arts, 


Poplar Branch. 


Ward, George Robert, 


Phil, 


Rose Hill. 


Weller, Hubert Raymond, 


Sci., 


Weldon. 


Whitehurst, Harold, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Whitley, George Franklin, 






ph.b., Elon College, 1902, 


Phil, 


Whitley, Va. 


Willcox, George William, 


Phil, 


Carbon ton. 


Willcox, Jesse Womble, 


Phil, 


Putnam. 


Wood, Walter Poole, 


Arts, 


Elizabeth City. 


Junior Class. 




Allard, Harry Ardell, 


Sci., Mill., 


Oxford, Mass. 


Archer, Frederick Charles, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Archer, Gray, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Bohannon, Ernest Frank, 


Phil, 


Winston-Salem. 


Brenizer, Addison Gorgas, Jr., 


A rts , 


Charlotte. 


Catlett, George Fitzhugh, 


Phil, 


Wilmington. 


Cobb, Whitfield, 


Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 


Council, Edward Augustus, 


Phil, 


Conoho. 


Cox, Albert Lyman, 


Arts, 


Penelo. 


Dameron, Edgar Samuel Williamson 


., Arts, 


Hobton. 


Daniels, Virgil Clayton, 


Phil, 


Oriental. 


Dunn, William, Jr., 


Phil, 


Newbern. 


Eagles, William Wooten, 


Arts, 


Crisp. 


Frost, Harry Barber, 


Sci., 


Providence, R. I. 


George, John Francis, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 



110 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Graham, Neill Ray, 
Graham, William Archibald, 
Gregory, Fletcher Harrison, 
Haigh, Severn Green, 
Harper, Ralph Moore, 
Hickerson, Thomas Felix, 
Holt, Lawrence Shackleford, Jr., 
Holton, Rolanda Clarence, 
Irwin, James Preston, 
Jacocks, William Picard, 
Johnston, Andrew Hall, 
Johnston, George Anderson, 
Kenan, Graham, 
King, Rush Ninde, 
Latta, Albert Whitehead, 
Lockhart, Luther Bynum, 
Mclver, Evander McNair, 
MacNider, George St. Clair Mallett, 
McRae, Cameron, 
Mann, Wade Hampton, 
Marriott, Williams McKim, 
Morrison, Theodore Davidson, 
Moser, Arthur Lee, 
Newton, Sprunt, 
Oldham, George Willis, 
Oldham, Wade Hampton, 
Osborne, Willie Ewell, 
Owen, Walter Benton, 
Pearson, John Henry, Jr., 
Pharr, Welborn Earl, 
Rankin, Willie Calvin, 
Ray, Edward, 
Robins, Sidney Swaim, 
Russell, Charles Phillips, 
Sawyer, Ernest Linwood, 
Sifford, Ernest, 



Phil., 


Charlotte. 




Arts, 


Warrenton. 




Arts, 


Halifax. 




Arts, 


Fayetteville. 




Phil, 


Kinston. 




Phil., 


Ronda. 




Sci., 


Burlington. 




Phil., 


Olympia. 




Sci., Min., 


Charlotte. 




Arts, 


Windsor. 




Phil., 


Asheville. 




Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 




Arts, 


Kenansville. 




Phil, 


Washington, D. C. 




Phil., 


Raleigh. 




Phil., 


University Station . 




Arts, 


Jonesboro. 




Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 




Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 




Arts, 


Saxapahaw. 




Sci., 


Baltimore, Md. 




Sci., 


Asheville. 




Arts, 


Hickory. 




Phil., 


Xenia. 




Arts, 


Teer. 




Sci., 


Teer. 




Phil., 


Greensboro, 




Sri., 


Liberty. 




Sci., 


Morganton. 




Sri., 


Wilkesboro. 


] 


Arts, 


Allemance. 




Arts, 


Albans. 




A lis, 


Asheboro. 




A rts, 


Rockingham. 




Phil., 


Elizabeth City. 




Phil., 


Charlotte. 





THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



111 



Staton, Marshall Cobb, 
Sutton, Theodore King, 
Swink, Walter Lee, 
Tavis, Bernie Cornelius, 
Whitaker, William Asbury, Jr., 
Winstead, Harry Wooding, 
Winston, James Horner, 
Worth, George Cunningham, 



Arts, 


Tarboro. 


A rts, 


Candor. 


Phil., 


Winston- Salem . 


Avis, 


Winston-Salem. 


Phil., 


Winston-Salem 


Phil., 


Leasburg. 


Avis, 


Durham. 


ScL, 


Asheboro. 




59. 



Sophomore Class. 



Amiek, William Gray, 


Phil, 


Liberty . 


Bailey, Frank Roseborough, 


Sai., 


Winston-Salem, 


Barnhardt, Charles Carroll, 


Phil, 


Whitsett. 


Betts, Clarence Edward, 


Arts, 


Albemarle. 


Bland, James Coran, 


Phil, 


Bostic. 


Boone, Samuel Bell, 


Arts, 


Jackson. 


Brigman, Lindo, 


Arts, 


Rockingham. 


Brown, Thomas Edwin, 


ScL; 


Wilmington. 


Burton, David Ranie, 


Phil, 


Winston-Salem , 


Carr, Claiborn MacDowell, 


Arts, 


Durham . 


Cash, Thomas Hamilton, 


Phil, 


Smith Grove. 


Cathey, William Cecil, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Cheshire, John, 


Phil, 


Tarboro. 


Cook, Marshall Edwards, 


Arts, 


Warrenton. 


Cox, Francis Augustus, 


Arts, 


Penelo. 


Cox, John Robert, 


Phil, 


Fremont. 


Daniel, Erasmus Alston, Jr., 


Arts, 


Air lie. 


Davis, Henry Wiley, 


Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Dunbar, Clarence, 


Elect., Law, Leechville. 


Emerson, Horace Mann, Jr 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Exum, James Thomas, 


Phil, 


Snow Hill. 


Fisher, William, Jr., 


Arts, 


Pensacola, Fla. 


Fogle, Paul Ernest, 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem, 


Gilmer, Joseph Branner, 


Phil, 


Waynesville. 


Gudger, Hubert Barnard, 


Phil, 


Asheville. 



112 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Haywood, Hubert Benbury, 


Phil., 


Raleigh. 


Heartt, William Alexander, 


Phil., 


Hillsboro. 


Higdon, Thomas Bragg, 


Phil., 


Higdonville. 


Hill, Thomas, 


Phil., 


Hillsboro. 


Hill, William Poindexter, Jr., 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem. 


Hines, Julian Colegate, Jr., 


Sci., 


Morven. 


Howard, Jasper Victor, 


Arts, 


Kinston. 


Hudson, Frank Simms, 


Phil., 


Cassville, Term. 


Hughes, Harvey Hatcher, 


Phil., 


Grover. 


Jones, Alexander Hamilton, 


Sci., 


Acton. 


Jones, Hamilton McRary, 


Arts, 


Warrenton . 


Jordon, Strowd, 


Arts, 


Caldwell Institute, 


Kelly, Lauchlin McLeod, 


Sci., 


Carthage. 


Lassiter, Benjamin Kittrell, 


Phil., 


Oxford. 


Lassiter, Salon McGee, 


Phil., 


Aulander. 


Ledbetter, Penlie Brisco, 


Phil., 


Davidson River. 


Lewis, Henry Stuart, 


Sci., 


Jackson. 


McAden, Thomas Cowan, 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


McBrayer, Frederick Wilkins, 


Phil., 


Rutherfordton. 


McCanless, Walter Frederic, 


Phil., 


High Point. 


McLean, Alfred McKethan, 


Phil., 


Burlington. 


McLean, Frank, 


Arts , 


Max ton. 


McLean, John Tyler, 


Phil., 


Burlington. 


McMullan, Harry, 


Phil., 


Edenton. 


Mallison, William Thomas, 


Phil., 


Washington. 


Martin, Earle Wall, 


Elect., Pin 


(/•., Morven. 


Meares, Thomas Davis, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Miller, Charles Walter, 


Phil, 


Sutherlands. 


Miller, William Gray, 


Sci., 


Siloarn. 


Moore, Jesse Lee, 


Phil., 


Patterson. 


Moore, Thomas Jefferson, 


Phil., 


Greenville. 


Moses, Herbert Henry, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Murphy, James Bumgardner, 


Sri., 


Morgan ton. 


Nichols, Austin Flint, 


Arts, 


Rocksboro. 


Nixon, Kemp Battle, 


Sri., 


Lincointon. 


Noble, Albert Morris, Jr., 


Phil., 


Selma. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



113 



Noble, Robert Primrose, 
Orr, Nathan Jordan, 
Osborne, Ephraim Brevard, 
Parsons, Thomas Leak, 
Pearoe, Robert Strange, 
Pender, Shepperd Turner, 
Perrett, Walter Kenneth, 
Perry, Rex William, 
Petty, James Carey, 
Philips, Henry Hyman, 
Robertson, Judge Buxton, 
Rose, Zeno Hardy, 
Ross, Charles, 
Ross, Otho Besoent, 
Ross, John William, 
Rountree, Louis Gustavus, 
Royall, Norman Norris, 
Shore, William Thomas, 
Singletary, George Currie, 
Sloan, Charles Henry, 
Tabor, George Leroy, 
Taliaferro, Walter Robertson, Jr. 
Thomas, George Gillette, Jr., 
Townsend, Newman Alexander, 
Tyson, John Joyner, 
Vaughan, John Henry, 
Wade, James Lloyd, 
Whitley, Wade Hampton, 
Wilson, John Kenyon, 
Wilson, Ronald Bonar, 
Wilson, William Miller, 
Woodruff, Berryman Edwards, 
Woollen, Charles Thomas, 
Worth, Henry Venable, 
Wrenn, Clement, 
Wright, Isaac Clark, 



Phil., 


Selma. 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


Sci., Min., 


Charlotte. 


Phil., 


Rockingham. 


Sci., 


Fayetteville. 


Phil, 


Oxford. 


Phil., 


Whitsett. 


Phil, 


Hartsville, S. C. 


Sci., 


Carthage. 


Sci., 


Tarboro. 


Phil., 


Hartshorn. 


Phil, 


Kenly. 


Elect., Lniu, 


Asheboro. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Siloam. 


Arts, 


New York City. 


Sci., 


Florence, S. C. 


Sci., 


Charlotte. 


A rts, 


Clarkton. 


Phil, 


Belmont. 


Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Phil, 


Raynham. 


Sci., 


Greenville. 


Phil, 


Siloam. 


Phil, 


Dunn. 


Phil, 


Pautigo. 


Phil, 


Elizabeth City. 


Phil, 


Greensboro. 


Phil, 


Rock HiU, S. C, 


Phil, 


Hartsville. 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem, 


Sci., 


Asheboro. 


Phil, 


Mount Airy. 


Arts, 


Coharrie. 



114 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Yelverton, Paul, 


Set., 


Goldsboro. 


Yopp, Charles Robinson, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 

98. 


Freshman Class. 




Abernetky, Benjamin Scott, 


Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 


Albright, Charles Alexander, 


Sci., 


Alamance. 


Allen, Matthew Hicks, 


Elect., Law, 


Kinston. 


Allison, William Pearson, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Armstrong, Joseph Mortier, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Attmore, George Sitgreaves, 


Arts, 


Stonewall. 


Bahnson, Agnew Hunter, 


Phil, 


Winston-Salem, 


Bernhardt, Clarence Theophilus, Jr. 


, Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Bernhardt, James Leak, 


Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Berry, John, Jr., 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Best, Edward Leigh, 


Sci., 


Mapleville. 


Boddie, James Wesley, 


Aits, 


Durham. 


Brown, Roy Melton, 


Phil, 


Rutherwood. 


Bryan, Roderick Adams, 


Phil, 


Carthage. 


Buchanan, Corsey Candler, 


Sci., 


Sylva. 


Burwell, Edmund Strudwick, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Bushnell, Herbert Leonard, 


Phil, 


Lenox Castle. 


Calder, Robert Edward, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Caldwell, Franklin McCullough, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Calvert, John Strong, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Cannon, James William, Jr., 


Sci., 


Concord. 


Chadwick, David Nichols, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Childs, Charles Eben, Jr., 


Sci. , 


Lincoln ton. 


Clark, Edwin, Jr., 


Arts, 


Weldon. 


Cheshire, Theophilus Parker, 


Phil, 


Tarboro. 


Clark, Stephen Chester, 


Sci., 


High Point. 


Cochran, Claude Allen, 


Phil, 


Star. 


Cole, Ernest Leach, 


Phil, 


Carbonton. 


Condon, Martin Joseph, Jr., 


A rts, 


New York City, 


Council, David Pendleton, 


Phil, 


Vilas. 


Crawford, Frederic Mull, 


Phil, 


Greensboro. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



115 



Crocker, George Fenton, 


Arts, 


Seaboard. 


Crump, Walter Moore, 


Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Curran, John Francis, 


Sci., 


Aspinwall, Pa. 


Dalton, Archie Carter, 


Phil., 


Greensboro. 


Daniels, Lloyd S., 


Sci., 


Wanchese. 


Davis, Isaiah Iverson, Jr., 


Phil., 


Morganton. 


Deans, "Willie Ophelia, 


.Sci., 


Spartanburg, S. C. 


Doughton, James Kemp, 


Phil., 


Sparta. 


Drane, Frank Parker, 


Phil., 


Edenton. 


Duncan, James Shepard, 


Phil., 


Beaufort. 


Edmonson, Frank Alexander, 


Phil., 


Morganton. 


Faison, Ellen John, 


Elect., 


Raleigh. 


Faison, Paul Fletcher, 


Elect., Law, Raleigh. 


Farrow, Garrason Anglo, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Fry, Howell Lewis, Jr., 


Sci., 


Greensboro. 


Galloway, Thomas, 


Sci., 


Toxaway. 


Godbey, Paul Stephen, 


Sci., 


Harmony. 


Gore, Walter Thomas, 


Phil., 


Winchester, Va. 


Goslen, Junius Blake, 


Phil., 


Wi ustou-Salem . 


Grant, Henry Spivey. 


Sci., 


Jackson. 


Gray, Eugene Early. Jr.. 


Phil.. 


Winston-Salem. 


Grimes, William Lawrence, 


Sci., 


Lexington. 


Groome, Bailey Troy. 


Phil.. 


Greensboro. 


Hannah, John George, Jr., 


Phil., 


Siler City. 


Harris, William Clyde. 


Phil., 


Raleigh. 


Hart, Bytha Mabrey. 


Sci., 


Tarboro. 


Haselden, William Rutherford, 


Phil., 


Williamsburg. S. C 


Hassell, Charles, 


Arts, 


Williamston. 


Heide, Samuel Skinner, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Henderson, Thomas Johnston, 


Arts, 


Yanceyville. 


Hendley, Charles James. 


Arts, 


Elmwood. 


Hester, Francis Eugene, 


Phil., 


Eagle Rock. 


Hiatt, Houston Boyd, 


Sci., 


Clinton. 


Hill, Hampden, 


Sci., 


Goldsboro. 


Hines, Harvey Carrow. 


Phil., 


Kinston. 


Hoffman, John Robert, 


Phil., 


Whitsett. 



116 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Hunter, Louis Jones, 


Sci., 


Huntersville. 


Hyatt, Fred Carlyle, 


Phil., 


Waynesville. 


Jacobs, Harry Hynian, 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem. 


Jones. Hamilton Chamberlain, Jr,, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Kerr, John Daniel, Jr.. 


Arts, 


Clinton. 


Kerr. James Stevens. 


Arts, 


Clinton. 


Kibler. William Herbert, 


Phil, 


Morganton. 


King, Isham, 


Phil, 


Sanford. 


Kluttz, Samuel, 


Elect., Law, 


Chester, S. C. 


Lambeth, John Addison, Jr., 


Phil., 


Fayette ville. 


Latham, Dawson. 


Sci., 


Ivie. 


Lauten. William Tatum, 


Phil., 


Nettle Ridge, Va, 


Leggett. Ernest Hodges, 


Sci., 


Palmyra. 


Leinbach, Robert Frederick. 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem . 


Lindau, Jules W.. Jr.. 


Sci., 


Greensboro. 


Littleton, Henry Ward, 


Phil., 


Albemarle. 


London, Isaac Spencer, 


Arts, 


Pittsboro. 


Love, Walter Bennett, 


Arts, 


Unionville. 


Lupton, Herbert, 


Sci., 


Newbern. 


Lyon, Otho DeVanne, 


Phil., 


Hester. 


McCain, Hugh White, 


Phil., 


Waxhaw. 


McDiamiid, McKinnon, 


Arts, 


Raeford. 


McDonald, Edmund, Jr., 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


McGeachy, Arthur, 


Phil., 


Lumberton. 


McGlohon, Jasper Jay, 


Sci., 


Ayden. 


McLain, Robert Henry, 


Arts, 


Concord. 


McMillan, Allen, 


Sci., 


Fayetteville. 


McNairy, John Marvin, 


Sci., 


Greensboro. 


McNeill, Thomas Alexander, Jr., 


Sci., 


Lumberton. 


McNider, James Small, 


Phil., 


Chapanoke. 


McPhail, Ama Riah, 


Sci., 


Clinton. 


McQueen, Anna, 


Elect., 


Rowland. 


Macaulay, William Allen, 


Arts, 


Huntersville. 


Mangum, Devere Lasker, 


Elect., Law, 


Creedmoor. 


Mann, William Henry Lee, 


Phil., 


Saxapahaw. 


Mayerberg, Israel, 


Sci., 


Goldsboro. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECOKD 



117 



Miller, Julian Sidney, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Miller, Thomas Grier, 


Arts, 


States ville. 


Millis, James Edward, 


Sci., 


High Point. 


Mills, Quincy Sharpe, 


A rts, 


Statesville. 


Moore, Louis Toomer, 


Phil., 


Wilmington. 


Nash, Abner, 


Arls, 


Charlotte. 


Nolthenius, Paul Tuteiu, 


Sci., 


Haarlem, Holland 


Norton, Cleveland Hunter, 


Phil, 


Durham. 


Norwood, Joseph Roby, 


Sci., 


Kilgo. 


Osborne, James Walker, 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


Parker, John Archibald, 


Phil., 


Linden. 


Patton, George Manuel, 


Phil., 


Elon College. 


Pemberton, Clarence Lilly, 


Sci., 


Payette ville. 


Perry, Bennett Hester, 


Phil., 


Henderson. 


Pryor, William Victor, 


Phil., 


Fruitland. 


Powers, Troy Cornelius, 


Phil., 


Lumberton. 


Pogue, Joseph Ezekiel, Jr., 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Redfern, Julian Edgar, 


Arts, 


Whitestore. 


Redfern, Rupert David, 


Phil., 


Whitestore. 


Reynolds, Robert Rice, 


Sci., 


Asheville. 


Roberson, Nelly, 


Elect. , 


Chapel Hill. 


Rosenbacher, Alladdin, 


Sci., 


Winston-Salem. 


Royal, Benjamin Franklin, 


Arts, 


Morehead City. 


Saunders, John Linker, 


Elect., 


Woodleaf. 


Scott, Ruby Theodore, 


Phil., 


Morrisville. 


Seagle, Perry Edgar, 


A rts , 


Hendersonville. 


Self, Marvin Bishop, 


Sci. , 


Hadley. 


Sergeant, Lacy Douglass, 


Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 


Shemwell, Dermot, 


Phil., 


Asheville. 


Simmons, Norwood Lee, 


Phil., 


Washington. 


Smith, Charles Capers, 


Elect., Law, 


Charleston, S. C. 


Smith, Thomas Harley, 


Phil., 


Liberty. 


Smith, William Robinson, Jr., 


Arls, 


Weldon. 


Stacy, Walter Parker, 


Arts, 


Morven. 


Stancell, Samuel Turner, 


Arts, 


Margaretts ville . 


Staton, John Arthur, 


Phil., 


Bethel. 



118 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Stedman, John Porter, 
Stephenson, Victor Lee, 
Tomlinson, Lawrence Archdale, 
Torrance, William Albert, 
Upchurch, William Merriman, 
Vaughn, Laurie Gibson, 
Washburn, Benjamin Earl, 
Weller, Francis Marshall, 
Whitaker, William Murray, 
Winborne, John Wallace, 
Wood, John Gilliam, Jr., 
Wood, Walter Alexander, 
Wooten, Lloyd Kirby, 
Wrenn, James Edward, 
Yelverton, Eugene Leslie, 
Yokley, James Fletcher, 



Students in Law. 
Regular Session. 

Adams, Stonewall Jackson, a.b., 1900, 

Adams, Thaddeus Awasaw, ph.b., 1903, 

Allen, Talbot Murray, A.B., Trinity College, 1900, 

Ballou, Robert Lucien, 

Barham, John Langhorne, 

Britton, Theodore Garfield, 

Brown, Thomas Edwin, 

Brownlee, Eugene, 

Cheek. Paul Tinsley, 

Clement, Hay den, 

Cook, James Sion, a.b., 1901, 

Curtis, Howard Coit, 

Davis, Eugene Grissom, 

Duncan, Julius Fletcher, a.b., a.m., 1902, 

Ehringhaus, John Christoph Blucher, a.b., 1901, 

Endicott, Thomas Peuington, 



Phil., 


Winston-Salem, 


Arts, 


Statesville. 


Phil., 


Durham. 


Phil., 


Charlotte. 


Phil., 


Morris ville. 


Set., 


Winston-Salem. 


Phil., 


Rutherfordton. 


Set., 


Weldon. 


lh 7., 


Trenton. 


Arts, 


Mege. 


Phil., 


Edenton. 


Sci., 


Brevard. 


Sci., 


Kinston. 


Sci., 


Lunar. 


Sci., 


Goldsboro. 


Phil., 


Mount Airy. 




156. 



Raleigh . 

Finch. 

Raleigh. 

Crampler. 

Newsoms, Va. 

Bethel. 

Wilmington. 

Cobleskill, N. Y. 

Mebane. 

Salisbury. 

Stokesdale. 

Southport. 

Fayette ville. 

Beaufort. 

Elizabeth City. 

Atlantic City, N. J. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



119 



Fuller, Thomas Staples, 

Gibson, James Breedeu, a.b., Wofford, 1901, 

Giles, Denison Foy, 

Gillam, Moses Braxton, 

Godwin, Robert Lynn, B.S., 1902, 

Goodman, Louis, 

Green, Edward Mathews, 

Green, George Chancellor, a.b., Georgetown, 1901, 

Griffin, Fairley Franklin, 

Gudger, Francis Asbury, 

Harris, Charles Upchurch, 

Herndon, Carl Hines, 

Herring, Robert Withington, 

Holladay, Shirley Judson, a.b., Orangeburg, 1900, 

Kinlaw, Wade Hampton, 

Lassiter, LeRoy Lear, 

Lockhart, James Alexander, Jr., a.b., 1900, 

London, Henry Mauger, a.b., 1899, 

Long, Jacob Elmer, 

Lucas, William Alonzo, 

Lunsford, Nathan, Jr., 

McLean, Sylvester Brown, 

McMichael, Thomas Glover, 

McRae, John Albert, 

McRorie, William Caldwell, 

Monteath, Archibald Durie, 

Moore, Joseph Chauning, 

Palmer, Jude, 

Peele, Jonathan, A.B.. Trinity College, 1900, 

Phelan, Maurice, 

Ramsey, Joseph Bunn, 

Ray, Jay Bis, 

Raymer, Dewey Little, 

Robins, Henry Moring, ph.b., 1902, 

Rountree, Jack Robert, 

Schenck, Michael, 



New York, N. Y . 

Gibson. 

Roxboro. 

Windsor. 

Dunn. 

Wilmington. 

Newbern. 

Weldon. 

Monroe. 

Asheville. 

Raleigh. 

Elon College. 

Harrell's Store. 

Suinmerton, S. C. 

Howellsville. 

Lasker. 

Wadesboro. 

Pittsboro. 

Greensboro. 

Lucama. 

Surl. 

Maxton. 

Charlotte. 

White Store. 

Coburn's Store. 

Asheville. 

Durham. 

Gulf. 

Gibson. 

Asheville. 

Rocky Mount. 

Burnsville. 

Rock Cut. 

Asheboro. 

Brooklyn, NVY, 

Greensboro. 



120 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Short, Henry Blount, Jr., a.b., 1902, 

Sinclair, Logan Carson, 

Smathers, William Frank, 

Smith, John Yates, Jr., 

Stewart, Hamilton Vernon, 

Taylor, Charles Edward, 

Thigpen, Kenneth Bayard, a.b., 1901, 

Thompson, Dorman Steele, ph.b., 1901, 

Wooten, Frank Marion, 

Wooten, James Franklin, 



Lake Waccamaw. 

Marion. 

Waynesville. 

Lumberton. 

Greensboro. 

Southport. 

Conetoe. 

States ville. 

Greenville. 

Kinston. 



Summer Term. 

Barham, John Langhorne, 

Brooks, Bernard Alexander, 

Busbee, Philip Hall, a.b., 1901, 

Clay, Joseph Scott, 

Cook, James Sion, a b., 1901, 

Cook, Leon Troy, 

Douglas, Stephen Arnold, a b., Georgetown, 1901, 

Bhringhaus, John Christoph Blucher, a.b., 1901, 

Gibson, Edward Herbert, 

Gibson, James Breeden, a.b., Wo ford, 1901, 

Glenn, John Frazier, ll.b., 1902, 

Grimes, Junius Daniel, a.b., 1899; ll.b., 

Georgetovm, 1902, 
Gwyn, James Alfred, ph.b., 1896, 
Hamblin, John Knapp, 
Hudson, Thomas Franklin, 
Hyams, Willie Washington, 
Ivie, Allan Denny, 
King, Charles Benjamin, 
Lunsford, Nathan, Jr., 
Luther, Watson Lenoir, 
McLean, Sylvester Brown, 
Palmer, Jude, 
Peele, Jonathan, a.b., Trinity College, 1900, 



Newsorus, Va. 

Nashville. 

Baleigh. 

Mebane. 

Stokesdale. 

Maxton. 

Greensboro. 

Elizabeth City. 

Gibson. 

Gibson. 

Avery's Creek. 

Grimesland. 

Ashevilie. 

Magnolia. 

Salisbury. 

Washington, D. C. 

Leaksville. 

Sanford. 

Surl. 

Candler. 

Maxton. 

Gulf. 

Gibson. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



121 



Preston, Edmund Randolph, ll.b., 



Washington and Lev University, 


Charlotte. 


Reynolds, George Spear, 


Asheville. 


Spell, Amos Purdie, 


Chance. 


Smith, Holland, 


Rockingham. 


Starr, Albert Luther, a.b., Lenoir, 1896, 


Startown. 


Woodall, James Lynn, 


Benson. 


Wooten, Frank Marion, 


Greenville. 


Wright, Thomas Loftin, s.b., 1897, 


Clinton. 
31 


Elementary Law. 




Allen* Matthew Hicks, 


Kinston. 


Bailey, Frank Rosehurgh, 


Winston-Salem, 


*Ballou, Robert Lucien, 


Crumpler. 


Bridgers, Burke Haywood, 


Wilmington. 


*Britton, Theodore Garfield, 


Bethel. 


*Brown, Thomas Edwin, 


Wilmington. 


Calder, Milton, 


Wilmington. 


Cannon, James "William, Jr., 


Concord. 


Gumming, Preston, Jr., 


Wilmington. 


*Ourtis, Howard Coit, 


Southport. 


Dunbar, Clarence, 


Leechville. 


Dunn, William, Jr., 


Newbern. 


Everett, Reuben Oscar, 


Palmyra. 


Faison, Paul Fletcher, 


Raleigh . 


Galloway, Gaston Gilbert, 


Mount Airy. 


Godbey, Paul Stephen, 


Harmony. 


Hassell, Francis Sylvester, 


Williamston. 


Harper, Ralph Moore, 


Kinston. 


Haywood, Alfred Williams, Jr., 


Haw River. 


*Herring, Robert Withington, 


Harrell's Store. 


Horner, James Wiley, 


Henderson. 


Johnston, Andrew Hall, 


Asheville. 


Jones, George Lyle, 


Franklin. 



122 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Kenan, Graham, 
*Kinlaw, Wade Hampton, 
*Lassiter, LeRoy Lear, 
Lassiter, Solon McGee, 
Lyon, Otho DeVanne. 
McAden, John Henry, Jr.. 
MoBrayer, Fred Wilkins. 
Mangum, Devere Lasker. 
Meares, Thomas Davis, Jr., 
Patton, George Manuel, 
Robins, Sidney Swaim, 
*Sohenck, Michael, 
Swink, Walter Lee, 
*Taylor, Charles Edward, 
Ward, George Robert, 



Kenansville. 

Howellsville. 

Lasker. 

Aulander. 

Hester. 

Charlotte. 

Rutherfordton. 

Creedmoor. 

Wilmington. 

Elon College. 

Asheboro. 

Greensboro. 

Winston-Salem . 

Southport. 

Rose Hill. 



Students in Medicine. 



Name. 
Abernethy, Claude Oliver, s.b., 1902, 
Belt, Townsend Wentworth, 
Berkeley, Green Ramsey, 
Blackwell, Calvin Simeon, Jr.. 
Bonner, Kemp Plummer Battle, 
Brooks, Baird Urquhart, S.B., 1901, 
Caveness, Zebulon Marvin, 
Clement, Edward Buehler, 
Con well, Charles Everett, 
Cooke, Quinton Henry, 
Cranmer, John Bensell, 
Dimmette, James Arthur, 
Disosway, Alpheus, 
Donnelly, John, a.b., 1899, 
Engle, William Royal, 
Farrar, Mont Royal, 

* Member of the Law School. 



Yeab. 


Residence. 


First, 


Chapel Hill. 


First, 


Leesburg, Va. 


First, 


Atlanta, Ga. 


First, 


Wilmington. 


Second, 


Aurora. 


Second, 


Nashville. 


Fourth, 


Velna. 


First, 


Salisbury. 


Second, 


Chapel Hill. 


Second, 


Aulander. 


Second, 


Chapel Hill. 


Second, 


Wiles. 


Second, . 


Newbern. 


Second, 


Charlotte. 


First, 


Tryon. 


Second, 


Greensboro, 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



123 



Farthing, Logan Elmore, 


First, 


Boone. 


Fenner, Edwin Ferebee, 


Second, 


Halifax. 


Fuller, Robert Walker, 


Second, 


Farmer. 


Gibson, John Shaw, 


Second, 


McColl, S. O. 


Gibson, Milton Reynolds, 


Second, 


Gibson. 


Gilmore, Willis Dowd, 


Fourth, 


Goldston. 


Grimes, William Lawrence, 


First , 


Lexington. 


Guthrie, Marshall Crapon, Jr., 


Sped at, 


Southport. 


Harper, James Henry, 


Second, 


Snow Hill. 


Harrison, Henry Hill, 


Second, 


Enfield. 


Herring, Robert Alexander, 


Second, 


Water Valley, Miss, 


Hiatt, Houston Boyd, 


First, 


Clinton. 


Hocutt, Battle Applewhite, 


First, 


Ennit. 


Hoggard, John Thomas, 


First, 


Aulander. 


Hovis, Leigh ton Watson, 


Second, 


Charlotte. 


Irwin, Hamner Carson, Jr., 


Second, 


Charlotte. 


Johnson, Livingston Franklin, 


Second, 


Han-ell's Store. 


Jones, Harry Murray, 


First, 


Franklin. 


Jordan, William Stone, 


First, 


Raleigh. 


Kafer, Oswald Ottmar, 


Second, 


Newbern. 


Knox, John, Jr., 


First, 


Pineville. 


Kuttner, Theodore, 


First, 


New York City. 


Lee, Earle Gordon, 


First, 


Clinton. 


McKinnon, Edward Haywood, 


■ 'First, 


Rowland. 


McLean, Peter, 


First, 


Laurinburg. 


MacNider, William DeBerniere, 


Fourth, 


Chapel Hill. 


Mann, James Emory, 


First, 


Fairfield. 


Marks, Richard Ernest, 


First, 


Corinth. 


Matthews, Martin Luther, 


Fourth, 


East Bend. 


Merritt, James Hamlett, 


First, 


Bethel Hill. 


Moore, Joseph Newit, 


Second, 


Saratoga. 


Newell, Leone Burns, 


Second, 


Newell. 


Norman, Joseph Hunter, 


Second, 


Halifax. 


Outlaw, James Bryan, 


Special, 


Goldsboro. 


Parker, John Williams, Jr., 


Second, 


Morrisville. 


Parker, Lester Leonidas, 


First, 


Monroe. 



124 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Parrott, Albert DeKalb, Jr., 


First, 


Kinston. 


Patterson, Joseph Flanner, 


First, 


Newbern. 


Perry, Henry, 


First, 


Sweet Water. 


Plummer, Alson Lindsay, 


First, 


Jones' Mine. 


Pritchard, Arthur Thomas, 


Second, 


Marshall. 


Rose, Abraham Hewitt, 


First, 


Smithfield. 


Ross, John Kirkland, 


Second, 


Charlotte. 


Roulhac, William Sterling, 


First, 


Spray. 


Saunders, Joseph Hubbard, 


Second, 


Washington. 


Sharpe, Frank Louis, 


Third, 


Statesville. 


Sheep, William Lloyd, 


First, 


Elizabeth City. 


Sherman, Joshua, 


First, 


New Tork City. 


Smathers, John Howell, 


Second, 


Waynesville. 


Smith, William Hopton, 


First, 


Goldsboro. 


Speight, Joseph Powell, 


First, 


Whitakers. 


Stanly, John Haywood, Jr., 


Third, 


Four Oaks. 


Starnes, Brand, 


First, 


Asheville. 


Steinen, Edward von den, 


Second, 


Cleveland, O^ 


Stevens, Ralph Sanders, 


Second, 


Smithfield. 


Stone, James Albert, 


Second, 


Calabash. 


Stringfield, Samuel Lanier, 


Second, 


Waynesville. 


Sutton, Carl White, 


Second, 


LaGrange. 


Tanker sley, James William, 


First, 


Salisbury. 


Turner, Henry Gray, 


First, 


Raleigh. 


Upchuroh, Oaley Geoffrey, 


First, 


Elm Grove. 


Webb, Lorenzo Stevenson, 


Second, 


Wilmington. 


Wilkerson, Charles Baynes, 


First, 


Roxboro. 


Willcox, Jesse Womble, 


First, 


Putnam. 


Williams, John Watkins. 


First, 


Washington. 


Wilson, Walter Pleasant, 


First, 


Heareford. 


Wyatt, James Leak, 


Second, 


Wadesboro. 
83. 



Students in Pharmacy. 



Ahrens, Adolph George, 
Austin, Troy Edward, 



Special, 
First, 



Wilmington. 
Smithfield. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



126 



Bass, Bisco Staton, 


First, 


Henderson. 


Bateman, Walter Castarphen, 


First, 


Wilson. 


Bell, Holley Mackie, 


First, 


Warrenton. 


Boddie, Samuel Perry, 


Special, 


Laurel. 


Boyette, Addie Howard, 


Special, 


Smithfleld. 


Bullock, David Archie, 


Second, 


Wilmington. 


Byrd, Clement, 


First, 


Wilson. 


Cannon, Claudius Lillington, 


First, 


Ayden. 


Cates, Claude Holt, 


First, 


Wakulla, Fla. 


Clements, William Jasper, 


First, 


Durham. 


Crowell, Charlie, 


First, 


Lincoln ton. 


Davenport, Peter Ernest, 


Second, 


Pactolus. 


Gardner, J. E., 


First, 


Ayden. 


Gilbert, Loamie, 


First, 


McKay. 


Gorham, Richard Speight, 


First, 


Rocky Mount. 


Graves, Yancy Baze, 


First, 


Moimt Airy. 


Griffin, Leonidas Coleman, 


Second, 


Marsh ville. 


Hicks, Oscar Vernon, 


Second, 


Goldsboro. 


Hicks, William Jacob, 


First,, 


Goldsboro. 


Hoffman, Solomon Wallace, 


First, 


Statesville. 


Hollowell, J. K., 


Second, 


Wilson. 


Hood, William, 


First, 


Smithfleld. 


Howell, John Thomas, 


First, 


Kenly. 


Jenkins, Joseph Van, 


First, 


Rocky Mount. 


Kluttz, Felix Hoyle, 


First, 


Albemarle. 


Lee, Permillas Arten, 


First, 


McKay. 


LeGwin, John Bunyan, 


First, 


Wilmington. 


Martin, Earle Wall, 


First, 


Morven. 


Matthews, Leander, 


First, 


Buies Creek. 


Pickelsimer, Jesse Benjamin, 


First, 


Brevard. 


Pemberton, Thomas Rush, 


First, 


Greensboro. 


Perry, William Morgan, 


Second, 


Elizabeth City. 


Pittman, Henry Hampton, 


Second, 


Lumberton. 


Rhodes, Thomas Floyd, 


Second, 


East Stroudsburg, Pa 


Richardson, Luther Wyatt, « 


First, 


Kenley. 


Scott, Shelton George, 


First, 


Elizabeth City. 



126 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Smith, John McNeill, 


First; 


Laurinburg. 


Snuggs, William Henry, 


First, 


Albemarle. 


Stewart, William Marsh, 


Second, 


Matthews. 


Stribling, Wilham George, 


First , 


Anderson, S. C. 


Taylor, Karl Dixon, 


Firs!, 


LaGrange. 


Tugwell, James Benjamin, 


Second, 


Tugwell. 


Webb, Clyde Irwin, 


First, 


Kings Mountain 


Webb, Eugene Lea, 


First, 


Roxboro. 
46. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

SUMMARY. 



127 



The College: — 








Graduates, 








Undergraduates. 






Course . 


Arts. 


Philosophy. 


Science 


Seniors, 


24 


24 


16 


Juniors, 


25 


19 


15 


Sophomores, 


19 


49 


27 


Freshmen, 


32 


63 


52 



Elect. 



The Law Department: — 

Students, Regular Session, 
Students, Summer Term, 

The Department of Medicine:- 
Fourth-Year Students, 
Third- Year Students, 
Second- Year Students, 
First-Year Students, 
Special Students, 

The Department of Pharmacy:- 
Second- Year Students, 
First- Year Students, 
Special Students, 



25 



64 

59 

98 

156 



02 



62 
31 



93 



4 

2 
36 
40 

1 

— 83 

12 

31 

3 

— 46 



Whole number of students, 
Names inserted twice, 



Summary by States. 



624 
16 



608 



North Carolina, 


563 


Georgia, 1 


South Carolina, 


12 


Holland, 1 


New York, 


8 


Kentucky, 1 


Virginia, 


7 


Massachusetts, 1 


District of Columbia, 


2 


Mississippi, 1 


Florida, 


2 


New Jersey, 1 


Maryland, 


2 


Ohio, 1 


Pennsylvania, 


2 


Rhode Island, 1 


Connecticut, 


1 


Tennessee, 1 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



FACULTY, 1903. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., President. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty and Professor 

of Greek. 

ROBERT MARSHALL BROWN, A.M., Instructor in Geography. 
JAMES DOWDEN BRUNER, Ph.D., Professor of French. 
COLLIER COBB, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 
WILLIAM L. FOUSHEE, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 
JULIUS I. FOUST, Ph.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
MAURICE GARLAND FULTON, M.A., Instructor in English. 
W. C. A. HAMMEL, Professor of Physics and Manual Training. 
HERMAN HARREL HORNE, Ph.D., Professor of Pyschology. 
MARGARET A. JOHNSTON, B A., Instructor in Kindergarten. 
MELVILLE VINCENT FORT, lastrwtor in Drawing. 
GEORGE M. McKIE, Instructor in Expression. 
CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, Professor of Physiology. ■ 
JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 
ARTHUR B. MORRILL, A.B., Professor of Psychology. 
MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, Professor of Pedagogy. 
CHARLES LEE RAPER, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
FRANKLIN L. RILEY, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
D. N. SHOEMAKER, Ph.D., Instructor in Botany. 
C. ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
MARVIN HENDRIX STACY, Ph.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., Professor of German. 
ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The tenth annual session of the University Summer School for Teachers 
■will begin at 10 A. m., June 15, and close on the afternoon of July 10. All 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



129 



the resources of the University will be open to those who attend, and it is 
believed that a glance through the courses here offered will convince the 
progressive teachers of North Carolina that it is the part neither of wisdom 
nor of economy for them to leave the State in order to secure the best in- 
struction in both text-books and methods. 



General Plan of 
Instruction. 



A total of 43 courses, including 
subjects of special value to 
teachers in every grade. 



The courses may be grouped under the following heads: 



COMMON SCHOOL SUBJECTS 


PSYCHOLOGY AND PED- 


HIGH SCHOOL AND COL- 


AND METHODS. 


AGOGY. 


LEGE SUBJECTS. 


Kindergarten. 


Psychology. 


Latin Grammar and Litera- 


Reading. 


Art of Teaching. 


ture. 


Expression. 


Philosophy of Education. 


Greek Grammar and Litera- 


Elementary Physiology. 


Philosophy of Method. 


ture. 


Elementary Physics. 


History of Education. 


English Grammar and Liter- 


Elementary Arithmetic. 




ature. 


Manual Training. 




French Grammar and Liter- 


Elementary Algebra. 




ature. 


English Composition. 




German Grammar and Liter- 


Geography. 




ature. 


Drawing. 




American History. 


Elementary History of the 




English History. 


United States. 




Greek and Roman History. 


History of North Carolina. 




Arithmetic and Algebra. 

Geology. 

Mineralogy. 

Advanced Physiology. 

Botany. 

Chemistry. 



Certificates will be issued to those members of the school who regularly 
attend and satisfactorily complete courses of not less than twenty-four 
periods. 



Special 
Advantages. 



All the privileges of the University 
open to students of the Summer 
School and at less cost than at 
any other season of the year. 



A regular course of lectures, both scientific and literary, has 
been provided, many of them being of direct practical value 
to the teacher and dealing with vital questions connected with 
the growth and development of our schools. The lecture courses will be 



Lecture 
Courses. 



130 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

free and will contribute greatly to the pleasure and profit of the teachers. 
The University Library, which contains more than 40,000 
volumes, will be open daily to members of the Summer School. 
There will thus be furnished, free of cost, a most excellent opportunity for 
collateral reading on any of the courses of study and for general reading 
in a wide range of subjects. 

The Physical. Chemical, Botanical and Zoological Labora- 
* tories of the University are modern in their equipment and are 
at the service of the Summer School. Laboratory methods and experience 
are necessary to the most successful teacher of today, and can be readily 
acquired only by actually doing laboratory work under the guidance of 
skilled instructors. 

The University buildings are located in a well shaded cam- 
pus of fifty acres, and Chapel Hill, with an elevation of five 
hundred feet, shady streets and pure, cool drinking water, offers a delight- 
ful summer home. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Pedagogy. 

Professor Noble. 

1. The Development and Philosophy of Method. Illustrative applications 

of method to the teaching of Beading, Elementary Arithmetic, 
Geography, and History of North Carolina. 

Professor Morrill. 

2. The Psychology and Art of Teaching. Lectures on Knowledge Get- 

ting, Memory, Habit, and Automatic Action. 

3. Courses of Study. Lectures on School Work and Courses of Study. 

Professor Horne. 

4. Psychology and Teaching. Lectures on the Problem of Education, 

Psychology and Education, History of Methods, Education of the 
Feelings and Will. 



THB UNIVERSITY RECORD 131 

5. The Philosophy of Education. Lectures on How to Study the Field of 
Education and on Aspects of Education. 

English. 

Dr. Smith. 

1. English Grammar. Lectures on the Grammar of Modern English. 

2. English Literature. Lectures on Tennyson and Browning. 

Mr. Fulton. 

3. Methods of Teaching Rhetoric and English Composition. Lectures, 

assigned readings, discussions. The course will include a discus- 
sion of the principles which underlie the most notable theories of 
rhetoric and composition, an application of these principles to 
certain urgent problems in the teaching of English, practical sug- 
gestions with reference to the planning and management of com- 
position work in secondary schools, and a critical examination of 
recent text-books. 

4. A Study of the Paragraph (based on Scott and Denney's Paragraph 

Writing) . The theory of the paragraph will be studied and tested 
by inductive analysis of specimens. This will be supplemented by 
lectures and discussions on the principles of sentence structure and 
the choice of words. Practice in writing will be made an impor- 
tant feature of the course. Themes will be read and discussed in 
class, and students will be given abundant opportunity for indi- 
vidual conference with the instructor. 

Mr. McKie. 

5. Expression. The course in expression will develop, by the discussion 

of suitable specimens of literature, principles useful in teaching 
vocal expression. Talks on voice culture and gesture will be given. 
Special attention will be given to the teaching of reading in the 
public schools. 

f! Shakespeare. The course in Shakespeare will consist of the rapid 
reading of a play selected by the class, and a discussion of its his- 
torical, literary and dramatic phases. 

The courses in expression and Shakespeare will be given on alternate 
days. 



132 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

History. 

Dr. Riley. 

1. Outlines of Greek and Roman History. This course will be devoted to 

a consideration of some of the most important developments in 
classical history. Especial attention will he directed to the 
methods of teaching these subjects in the high schools. The most 
important results of recent explorations will also be noted as far 
as practicable. Six hours a week, throughout the term. 

2. Elementary History of the United States. This course will be given 

with special reference to the needs of teachers in the public schools. 
It will embrace a brief outline of colonial history, followed by a 
more detailed account of the early history of the country under the 
Constitution. Attention will be devoted incidentally to the ob- 
jects of elementary instruction in history and to the methods of 
teaching this subject. Six hours a week, throughout the term. 

Dr. Raper. 

3. English History. An outline study of the English people in their polit- 

ical, constitutional, economic, social, religious and intellectual 
aspects. Three hours a week. 

4. American History. An outline study of the American people in their 

political, constitutional, economic, social, religious and intellectual 
aspects. Three hours a week. 

For History of North Carolina, see page 130, under Pedagogy. 

Mathematics. 

Professor Foust. 

1. Arithmetic. A study of objects leading to the discovery of the "four 

fundamental rules" and the natural method of teaching those 
rules; methods of drill in the use of figures; application of the 
"four fundamental rules" to percentage, interest and the arith- 
metical problems of business; the unity of arithmetical processes. 

2. Advanced Arithmetic. Fractions, Percentage, Interest, Bank Dis- 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 133 

count, Practical Measurements, Ratio and Proportion, Partner- 
ship, Square Root, Cube Root. 

Mr. Stacy. 

3. Algebra. This is a course in methods and will deal entirely with Fac- 
toring, Greatest Common Divisor, Least Common Multiple, Frac- 
tions, Equations, Square Root, Cube Root, Solution of Problems, 
and Binomial Theorem, 

Geography. 

Professor Brown. 

1. The Earth as a Globe, Weather Elements, the Ocean, Physiographic 

Forms, Classification of Land Forms, Geographic Controls and 
Factors. 

2. Laboratory Work and Field Excursions. This will include a study of 

methods and materials with exercises from Weather Maps, To- 
pographic Maps, etc. The field work will consist of a study of 
Home Geography and of methods. 

Geology and Mineralogy. 

Professor Cobb. 

1. Elementary Geology. Lectures, field-work and laboratory- work. The 

course is given with special reference to its use as a basis for phys- 
ical geography work. Five hours a week. 

2. Elementary Mineralogy. Laboratory-work and field-work. Five hours 

a week. 
Saturdays are left free for the longer field excursions. 

Physics and Manual Training. 

Dr. Mills. 
1. Elementary Physics. Lectures and Recitations. Six hours a ireeK. 



134 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Professor Hammel. 

2. Construction of Physical Apparatus. Lectures on the construction of 

the simpler apparatus required in the study of Elementary Physics. 

3. Manual Training. This course will be devoted to Paper Folding, Card 

board and Knife Work. 

4. Manual Training. A series of practical lectures on Raphia, Reed Bas- 

ketry, etc. (See also under Kindergarten.) 



Botany. 

Dr. Shoemaker. 
1. Cryptogams and Flowering Plants. Lectures on the Morphology of a few 
Cryptogams, and the Anatomy and Physiology of Flowering 
Plants. This work will be supplemented by work in the Labora- 
tory and Field, and is intended to help teachers in Common Schools 
and Graded Schools. 



Physiology and Hygiene. 

Dr. Mangum. 

1. Elementary Physiology. This course, for beginners, gives a description 

of the human body and the functions of the organs. School Hy- 
giene will also be discussed. One hour daily. 

2. Advanced Physiology. In this course certain parts of the subject will 

be taken up and thoroughly discussed. The laws of Hygiene will 
also be emphasized. One hour daily. 

Drawing. 

Miss Fort. 
1. Elementary Drawing. A course for teachers in the Common Schools. 
The work will consist of Free- Arm Movement Exercises, Black- 
board Drawing and Drawing from Objects. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 135 

2. Advanced Drawing. Lectures on Brush and Ink Work, Colored Chalk 
and Picture Study. 

Chemsitry. 

Dr. Wheeler. 

1. Elementary Course in General Chemistry. Lectures and laboratory 

work. One hour daily. 

2. Advanced Laboratory Work. On application. 

Kindergarten. 

Miss Johnston. 
1. Primary Work. Talks on how the Kindergarten may prepare for 
Primary Work. Suggestions on the Construction of Programs for 
Kindergarten, Connecting Class and Primary. 

2.. Manual Training in the Kindergarten. Talks on elementary work in 
Cardboard, Raphia and Reed Weaving. 

Greek. 

Dr. Alexander. 

1. For beginners. Ball's The Elements of Greek will be used. Thiscourse 

will enable teachers to reach a point from which they can con- 
tinue the study of Greek without an instructor. 

2. Book I. of Xenophon's Anabasis, with a review of important princi- 

ples of grammar. This course can be taken by teachers who have 
studied Greek for one year. Three times a week. 

.3. Greek Literature in English, primarily for teachers who have not studied 
Greek. The instructor will translate, with brief comments, six 
books of Homer's Odyssey, the Medea of Euripides, and the Plutus 
of Aristophanes. Those who have studied Greek at all will follow 



136 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

the instructor's translation more profitably, if they provide them- 
selves with the Greek texts. Three times a week. 



Latin. 

Dr Foushee. 

1. Elementary Course. Study of forms and the simple rules of syntax. 

Study of words showing the relation of Latin to English . (In- 
tended for those who have never studied Latin and those who 
teach beginners.) 

2. Advanced Course. Reading of easy Latin: Viri Romse, Caesar or Se- 

lections from Vergil's iEneid. Composition. 

A course, if desired, will be given for the benefit of those who wish 
to further their work of last summer, taking up Horace and Cice- 
ro and advanced composition. 

French. 

Dr. Bruner. 

1. Teachers' Course. The Elements of Grammar, Pronunciation, Rapid 

Reading of easy prose. Reading at sight. 

2. Teachers' Course. Rapid Reading of Victor Hugo's Hernani and Ra- 

cine's Esther. lectures. 



German. 

Professor Toy. 

1. Practice in Forms. Systematic instruction in Translation. Brief dis- 

cussions of Methods of Teaching. 

Intended for those who have had no acquaintance with the subject. It 
is expected that diligent application in this course 'will enable the 
student to carry on with profit his subsequent work in this subject. 

2. Practice in Wide Reading. 

Intended for those who have had at least one year's instruction. In 
connection with the translation there will be brief explanations of 
grammar and literature. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

EXPENSES. 



137 



There will be no charge for tuition in the Summer School. An incident- 
al fee of five dollars will, however, be charged. Board and rooms may be 
obtained in the village at from $9.00 .to $10.00 for four weeks. 

Carriages and baggage wagons meet all trains. Trains arrive from east 
and west at 11 a. m. and 5:45 p. m.; leave at 8:35 a. m. and 2:00 p. m. Re- 
duced ratt-s on all railroads. For additional information, address 

F. P. VENABLE, President, 

Chapel ffill, N. C. 



STUDENTS IN STJMMEB SCHOOL, 1902. 



Alexander, Mary F., 
Allen, Elizabeth, 
Archer, Caroline, 
Archer, Francis Randolph, 
Barron, Addie B., 
Battle, Pattie Viola, 
Blackburn, Bettie, 
Bloom , Lester, 
Boger, Charles E., 
Brooks, Lucy, 
Capehart, M. G., 
Carter, Lyta R., 
Catlett, Margaret M., 
Cheshire, Kate, 
Clapp, D. P., 
Cobb, Penelope Williams, 
Coke, Louise T., 
Cole, Mary Kate, 
Cuthbertson, Minnie A., 
Daniel, Sara Morton, 
Davis, J., 



Fayetteville. 

Goldsboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Charlotte. 

Lilesville. 

Guilford College. 

Charlotte. 

Concord. 

Grifton. 

Avoca. 

Nashville. 

Wilmington. 

Tarboro. 

Whitsett. 

Chapel Hill. 

Edenton. 

Carthage. 

Charlotte. 

Oxford. 

Mount Airy. 



138 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Davis, Mary M. , 
Dawson, Bertha B., 
Donnell, Loula H., 
Donnelly, Bertha M., 
Donnelly, Margaret, 
Dunlap, Bessie, 
Evans, Bettie W., 
Everett, S. Justus, 
Fleming, Mrs. Kate Hays, 
Gilliam, H. E., 
Graham, Mary, 
Gray, M. G., 
Grier, Feriba, 
Haigh, Alice S., 
Henderson, Jessie, 
Herndon, Corrinna, 
Hicks, L. S., 
Hoell, Charles F., 
Holmes, Henrietta, 
Home, Delia E., 
Howell, Andrew, Jr., 
Hughes, Annie L., 
Humber, Rosa C, 
Kirby, Sarah, 
Kirkpatrick, Zelma, 
Lambeth, Simmons, 
Love, Edna, 
Loy, H. M., 
McOlintock, Jennie P., 
McClintock, Maggie B.. 
McDuffie, Jennie, 
McWhorter, Z. D., 
Means, Gaston B., 
Merritt, Bessie, 
Merritt, Robert A., 
Miller, Mary B., 



Waynesville. 

Grifton. 

Chapel Hill. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Ansonville. 

Fayetteville. 

Palmyra. 

Oxford. 

Windsor. 

Charlotte. 

Windsor. 

Charlotte. 

Fayetteville. 

Charlotte. 

Durham. 

Raleigh. 

Aurora. 

Fayetteville 

Tarboro. 

Wilmington. 

Cedar Grove. 

Carthage. 

Goldsboro. 

Charlotte. 

Thomas ville. 

Taylorsville. 

Osceola. 

Charlotte. 

Charlotte. 

Fayetteville. 

Mount Olive. 

Concord. 

Mount Airy. 

Chapel Hill, 

Sardis, 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



139 



Mills, Mary P., 
Moore, Fannie B.. 
Moore, Gertrude E., 
Nash, Bettie L., 
Nooe, Allie, 
Nye, F. 0., 
Orr, Cora, 
Orr, W. F., 
Pannill, Florence D., 
Paris, Addie, 
Patterson, Jennie, 
Perkins, Annie, 
Rankin, F. B., 
Rogers, Mamie, 
Ross, Frederick P., 
Shipp, Kate C, 
Skinner, B. S., 
Smith, Clyde, 
Stamps, Miriam, 
Stevenson, Mrs. D. F., 
Stuart, E. May, 
Thackston, Henry E., 
Troy, Lota Lee, 
Troy, Nina Webb, 
Wiatt, D. B., 
Wallace, Mary, 
Webb, Jessie A., 
Whitaker, Bessie L., 
Whitaker, Myrtle M., 
Whitehead, Margaret R., 
Wiley, Mary E., 
Williams, Sue, 
Wilson, J. N., 



Raleigh. 
Charlotte. 
'Kinston. 
Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Merry Oaks. 
Charlotte. 
Reidsville. 
Reidsville. 
Rocky Mount. 
China Grove. 
Greenville. 
Mount Holly. 
Graham. 
Concord. 
Lincolnton. 
Hertford. 
Goldsboro. 
Raleigh. 
Statesville. 
Carthage. 
Raleigh. 
Chapel Hill. 
Chapel Hill. 
Raleigh. 
Sardis. 
Roxboro. 
Raleigh. 
Kinston. 
Fayette ville. 
Salisbury. 
Ceffo. 
Cullowhee. 
90. 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 



OFFICERS. 



Eben Alexander, Ph.D., LL.D., Supervisor. 
Charles Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., Committeeman. 
Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Committeeman. 
Louis Round Wilson, A.M., Librarian. 
George Lyle Jones, Assistant. 
Ernest Linwood Sawyer, Assistant. 
Sidney Swatm Robins, Assistant. 
Frederick Charles Archer, Assistant. 

The University Library contains forty thousand two hundred volumes 
and about fifteen thousand pamphlets. The collection of books is being 
re-classified and re-catalogued according to the Dewey, or decimal system. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies have made a donation 
of their valuable collection of twenty thousand volumes to the Library, 
and provided for its perpetual endowment. The official title of the Libra- 
ry is now The Library of the University op North Carolina en- 
dowed by the Philanthropic and Dialectic Literary Societies. 

The funds available for the increase of the Library are expended under 
the direction of the Supervisor, the Librarian and the Library Committee, 
with special reference to the instruction given in the University. The an- 
nual increase from purchase, bequests and exchanges averages about one 
thousand five hundred volumes. The books are carefully classified and 
catalogued by author, subject and title. 

Extensive improvements in the arrangement and administration of the 
Library have been made in the direction of better light, more room and 
greater efficiency and comfort. The librarian and his assistants are in at- 
tendance to give help in any line of research or reading. The reading 
room is supplied with the best foreign and American periodicals and the 
leading newspapers of the State and Nation. The students of the Uni- 



THB UNIVERSITY RECORD 141 

versity are allowed access, under necessary limitations, to the book-shelves. 
The Library and Reading-room are open every week day from 9 a. m. to 
1:15 P. M., and from 2 to 5 P. M., and on Sunday from 2:45 to 3:45 P. M. 

The University acknowledges gifts to the Library during the past year 
from E. Alexander, American Friends' Peace Conference, E. M. Armfleld, 
Miss L. Armfleld, E. S. Balch, K. P. Battle, Boston Public Library, Mrs. 
M. E. Bridgers, Rev. J. R. Brooks, Chicago and Evanston Library, Chicago 
Central Y. M. C. A., Columbia University, Connecticut Board of Health and 
State Librarian, Mrs. J. C. Graves, W. M. Gulick, J. H. Hyde, Illinois 
Factory Inspectors, Indiana Chickamaugan Commission and Secretary of 
State, Johns Hopkins University, Kansas State Historical Society and 
State Tax Commission, A. B. King, Library of Congress, Massachusetts 
Board of Education and State Board of Charity, Michigan State Tax Com- 
mission, W. S. Myers, New Jersey Secretary of State, New York Secretary 
of State, State Historian and State Library, North Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion, Secretary of State and other State officers, R. I. Patterson, Peabody 
Institute, Pennsylvania Historical Society, Secretary of State, and Socie- 
ty of the Sons of the Revolution, A. S. Pierson, C. L. Raper, Registration 
and Trust Co., C. A. Robinson, R. S. Royster, C. A. Smith, Southern Ed- 
ucational Conference, Rev. E. Stephens, C. W. Super, Superintendents of 
Public Instruction of California. Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, 
South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wis- 
consin and Wyoming, U. S. Superintendent of Public Documents and other 
officials and bureaus, University Club, University of Alabama, University of 
Michigan, H. Weil, Mrs. E. Weil, A. Welcker, A. S. Wheeler, Mrs. S. Whit- 
aker, W.S.Wilson, Wisconsin State Historical Society and StateTax Commis- 
sion, Yackety-Yack Committee, Advocate of Peace, American Economist, 
Asheville Citizen, Atlantic Educational Journal, Bulletin of University of 
Virginia, Carolina Medical Journal, Case and Comment, Caucasian, Chapel 
Hill News, Charity and Children, Charlotte News, Chatham Record, Chris- 
tian Advocate, Church Standard, Cleveland Star, Columbia University Quar- 
terly, Commonwealth, Delineator, Democratic Banner, Duplin Journal, Ev- 
erybody's Magazine, Exchanges of University of North Carolina Maga- 
zine, Fayetteville Observer, Fisherman and Farmer, Franklin Times, Gos- 






142 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

pel Messenger, Green County Standard, Greensboro Record, Henderson 
Times, Homiletic Review, King's Weekly, Lenoir Topic, Manufacturer's 
Record, Mooresville Enterprise, Music Life, N. O. Law Journal, Newton 
Enterprise, Philadelphia Public Ledger, Polk County News, Presbyterian 
Standard, Progressive Farmer. Raleigh Times, Red Springs Banner, Reids- 
ville Review, Religious Herald, Richmond Times, Roanoke-Chowan Times, 
Salvation, Smithfield Herald, Southern Presbyterian, Statesville Land- 
mark, Sunset, Technology Review, Texas Quarterly, Trinity Archive, 
Twin-City Daily Sentinel, Virginian Pilot, Waynesville Courier, Webster's 
Weekly, Weekly Times, Williamston Enterprise, Wilmington Messenger, 
Wilmington Weekly Star, Wilson Times, Windsor Ledger. 



THE GYMNASIUM. 



Edwakd von den Steinen. Instructor in Physical Culture. 

Memorial Hall is used as the University Gymnasium, affording a practi- 
cally unlimited supply of air, light and space for all sorts of gymnastic ex- 
ercises. Inside of the hall is a running track one sixteenth of a mile long 
and there is an abundant supply of gymnastic apparatus. Exercise in the 
Gymnasium is required three hours a week of all the students in College 
except Seniors. A thorough physical examination of each student is made 
in the: fall, and, in case the student desires it, another in the spring. The 
measurements are indicated in a Prescription of Exercise pamphlet and 
are furnished to the students free of charge in the fall term. This hook 
contains directions for the developing of every part of the body as well as 
suggestions on hygiene and personal care of the body; it is free from tech- 
nicalities and confusing terms. Too much importance cannot be attached 
to the physical examination, since it enables the student to work intelli- 
gently and economize his time. The physical examination is designed to 
aid the student by pointing out defects, and causing him to direct his 

efforts toward the correction of them. 
10 



LABORATORIES AST) MUSEUMS. 



THE PHYSICAL LABOBATOBY. 

Joshua Walker Gore, O.E., Director and Professor of Physics. 
James Edward Latta, A.M., Instructor in Physics. 

The Physical Laboratory occupies the eastern half of both the main and 
basement floors of the Alumni Building, amounting to about five thousand 
square feet of floor space. 

The main floor is divided into a lecture room, an apparatus room, labor- 
atory for students in the general course, Physics 1, and a laboratory for 
more advanced work in electrical testing and measurements, Physics 4. 

The basement floor is being equipped with standard types of electrical 
machines: dynamos, motors, transformers, meters, switchboard, storage 
battery and the accessories needed for practical instruction in electrical en- 
gineering. 

The facilities for teaching Physics experimentally will be increased before 
the opening of next session by the expenditure of five thousand dollars for 
apparatus and equipment. 

The electric light and central heating plants constitute valuable adjuncts 
to the laboratory. 

THE CHEMICAL LABOBATOBY. 

Charles Baskervtlle, Ph.D., Director and Smith Professor of General 
and Industrial Chemistry. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. 

Alvtn Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D. , Associate Professor of Organic Chemis- 
try. 

james Edward Mills, Ph.D., Instructor in General and Physical Chem- 



THE UNIVERSITY KECOED 145 

Royaix Oscar Eugene Davis, Ph.B,, Assistant in Analytical Chemistry. 
Hugh Hammond Bennett, Assistant in the Laboratory. 
Hazel Holland, Assistant in Charge of the Store Room. 

The building formerly known as Person Hall is now used as the Chemi- 
cal Laboratory. It has been enlarged and forms a convenient and well- 
arranged system of laboratories for a limited number of workers. The 
rooms are eleven in number and contain about six thousand square feet of 
floor space. The pitch of the rooms is twenty feet, and they are lighted 
by numerous large windows, five feet by ten in size. 

There is a large lecture room with a seating capacity of one hundred and 
fifty. The sides and rear of the room have glass cases for the display 
of a handsome line of specimens, scientific and technical. The room is 
lighted by electricity. In addition to its use as a lecture room, it is used 
as a place of meeting by the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 

Adjoining the lecture room is the private laboratory of the Director, and 
a smaller room for the storage of specimens and finer apparatus. The west 
wing of the laboratory is divided into laboratories for qualitative and 
quantitative analysis, furnishing desk-space for sixty-one and twenty-eight 
students respectively. The laboratory is provided with hoods for carrying 
off noxious gases. There is a small room also, cut off from the other lab- 
oratories, in which dangerous or disagreeable experiments may be per- 
formed. 

The rear portion of the laboratory is almost a reproduction of the front 
in size and outline. It is divided into a balance room, containing nine 
modern balances and one assay balance, a library, a room with desk-space 
for five students in physical chemistry, an assay room provided with a set 
of gas furnaces, a laboratory for toxicological, physiological or other spec- 
ial work, and a store room. In the assay room is placed a large still, which 
provides an abundance of distilled water. 

The laboratories are supplied with water providing good suction. Anew 
and modern gas machine, which supplies ample heat, has recently been 
installed. The average expenditure for apparatus amounts to fifteen hun- 
dred dollars annually. Recently apparatus for gas analysis and many lines 
of technical work have been purchased; also a new vacuum pump, electric 
furnace, Steinheil grating spectroscope and other apparatus for refined 



146 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

and accurate work. A room has been fitted up in the New West Building 
forrefined spectroscopic work. For the coming session there will be ready 
another room in the basement of Alumni Hall provided with electric fur- 
naces and the modern apparatus for demonstration of the application of 
electricity to chemical technology. 



THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM. 



*Henrt van Peters Wilson, Ph.D., Director and Professor of Biology. 
James Edwin Duerden, Ph.D., A.R.C.S. (Lond.), Acting Professor of 

Biology. 
William Chambers Coker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
Clarence Albert Shore, S.M., Instructor in Biology. 
Ivey Foreman Lewis, A.B., Assistant in Biology. 

The Biological Laboratory occupies the upper floor of the New East 
Building, and includes a lecture room, a main laboratory, two smaller lab- 
oratories for advanced students, a" private workroom and a storeroom. The 
entire floor space is something over four thousand square feet. 

The equipment is especially adapted to the needs of modern microscopi- 
cal work, and includes compound and dissecting microscopes, microtomes, 
parafin and hot air baths, incubator, camera lucidas, immersion lenses, etc. 
All rooms in the laboratory are supplied with running water. In addition 
to the sinks, there are several large aquarium tables in which living ani- 
mals may be kept for breeding purposes, study of their habits, or class 
work. 

The museum collections are arranged in cases in the main laboratory. 
The marine fauna of the Atlantic coast is well represented. There are 
very serviceable collections of bird skins, bird eggs, insects and flowering 
plants. Students engaged in advanced work have access to microscopic 
preparations, illustrating the anatomy and development of sponges and 
corals, the histology of medusae, the development of teleosts and other ob- 
jects of morphological interest. The departmental library includes many 
valuable books of reference, treatises and zoological journals. 

♦Absent on leave, 1902-'03. 






THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 147 

THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM. 

Collier Cobb, A.M., Director and Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Robert Gilliam Lassiter, Assistant in Geology. 

Robert Arthur Lichtenthaeler, S.B., Assistant in Geology. 

The Geological Laboratory occupies the first floor of the New East Build- 
ing. In addition to a lecture room with a seating capacity of about nine- 
ty students, there is a large laboratory supplied with working collections 
of minerals, rocks and fossils, and with photographs, maps and models il- 
lustrating geological structure. The laboratory is furnished with two petro- 
graphical microscopes, and with apparatus for the slicing and polishing of 
rocks. Microscopic slides have been made of most of the specimens from 
North Carolina; and the department has, also, sections of the typical Eu- 
ropean rocks. Sections of the rocks around Chapel Hill, and the igneous 
rocks of the Boston Basin, made by the late Hunter Lee Harris, of the class 
of 1889, were given to the geological department. A room for photographic 
work has recently been added. 

The University possesses a collection of more than two thousand speci- 
mens of typical rocks and minerals from various European localities, and 
of large specimens of building stones, coals and various products illustrat- 
ing the economic geology of the State. These are arranged in an exhibi- 
tion room of six hundred and fifty square feet of floor space. Here are 
kept also the sections taken with a diamond drill in the coal regions of 
Pennsylvania, in the region round King's Mountain, where the Summer 
School in Geology held its sessions, in the Dan River coal fields and in the 
Triassic Rocks at Durham, N. C. A complete set of the ores of the pre- 
cious metals found along the line of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Rail- 
road is included in the collection. Valuable additions have been made to 
the collections of fossils also, affording increased opportunity for laboratory 
work in historical geology and palaeontology. The collection illustrating 
economic geology has been largely increased. 

The Departmental library, which occupies a room adjoining the exhib- 
ition room, is supplied with State and United States Reports, the papers 
of working geologists, the best works upon Geology, and scientific periodi- 
cals. 



THE TTCQVEKSITY OKGAETIZATIONS. 



THE DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC LITERARY 
SOCIETIES. 



The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies were organized in 
1795, the year of the opening of the University. Their existence has been 
inseparably linked with that of the University, and they have shown re- 
markable power in developing character as well as in training the intellect. 
They offer facilities for practice in debate, oratory, declamation and essay 
writing; and their members become practically familiar with parliament- 
ary law and usage. 

Each society owns a large, handsomely furnished hall, the walls of which 
are hung with oil portraits of illustrious members. Meetings are held by 
each society every Saturday night during the College year, admission be- 
ing confined to members. Public contests in debate between the two so- 
cieties are conducted twice a year and in addition to these, there is a sys- 
tem of intercollegiate debates. During Commencement week, each socie- 
ty holds its own annual reunion. On Tuesday night preceding Com- 
mencement four representatives elected from the two societies have a pub- 
lic competition in debate, and a prize is awarded to the successful com- 
petitors. 

By immemorial custom, students from the eastern half of the State usually 
join the Philanthropic Society, while those from the western half join the 
Dialectic Society. Although membership in the societies is entirely op- 
tional, yet it is earnestly recommended by the Faculty as furnishing unus- 
ual opportunities not only for literary culture, but also for the develop- 
ment of self-control and the power to persuade and control others. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 149 

THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

Collier Cobb, A.M., President. 

William Chambers Coker, Ph.D., Vice-President. 

Francis Preston Venablf., Ph.D., Permanent Secretary and Treasurer. 

Charles Baskervtlle, Ph.D., Recording Secretary. 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society holds monthly meetings during the 
College year for the discussion of scientific subjects. A Journal is issued 
semi-annually. The object of the Society is to encourage scientific research 
and to record such matters as pertain to the natural history of the State. 
The membership is at present restricted to the Faculty and students of the 
University, and members of the staff of the Geological Survey. 

At the monthly meetings, which are ordinarily held on the second Tues- 
day of each month, excellent opportunities are afforded the students to get 
beyond the ordinary routine of the class room by hearing, reading and dis - 
cussing papers on scientific subjects. 

The Journal is in a measure a bulletin of the scientific laboratories of the 
University, and contains many articles written by students. It is now in 
the nineteenth year. The volumes already issued contain nineteen hun- 
dred pages. By the exchange of the Journal with more than three hun- 
dred scientific journals and periodicals, over ten thousand books and pam- 
phlets have been collected, all of which are arranged in the University 
Library. 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, LL.D., President. 
Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Treasurer. 
Robert Withington Herring, Secretary. 

The North Carolina Historical Society was founded in 1843 by the Hon. 
David L. Swain, LL.D., President of the University. Under his leader- 
ship it became the centre of historical work in the State and the medium 
of many notable contributions to State history. On March 22, 1875, through 



150 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

the activity of Dr. Battle, the Society was chartered by an act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. The purpose of the Society is to collect, classify, investi- 
gate and publish material illustrative of the history of the State. The 
Historical Society possesses a valuable collection of books, pamphlets, man- 
uscripts, newspaper files, coins and other subjects of historic interest. The 
educational aim of the Society is to create a love of historical study and to 
give training in scientific methods of historical investigation. To this 
end meetings are held monthly in the History lecture room, at which 
papers, based on original research, are read and discussed. All members 
of the University are eligible to membership. 

THE SHAKSPERE CLUB. 

Thomas Hume, D.D., LL.D., President. 
O. Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
Henry Richard McFadyen, Secretary. 

The Shakspere Club was organized in October, 1885, for the special pur- 
pose of giving impulse and guidance to scholarly investigation of the great 
dramatist. But an important aim was to offer opportunity for compara- 
tive studies in the dramatic literature of ancient and modern languages, 
and also to excite interest in the art of literary composition. Seminary 
methods are pursued by advanced students, and the results are presented 
in papers. The Club has a small but valuable collection of special refer- 
ence books. Meetings are held monthly in the University Chapel. 

THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB. 

Thomas Hume, D.D., LL.D., President. 
Thomas James Wilson, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
Walter Dallam Toy, M.A., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Philological Club meets on the first Tuesday night of each month 
during the College year. Its membership consists of the instructors and 
advanced students in the language departments of the University. The 
object of the Club is to stimulate original investigation in philology and 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 151 

literature, and to afford an opportunity for the interchange of views on 
subjects relating to such work. At each meeting papers are read and dis- 
cussed. All persons interested in the work of the Club are invited to at- 
tend its meetings. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



Ralph Moore Harper, President. 
Frank Simms Hudson, Vice-President. 
Jasper Victor Howard, Recording Secretary. 
Charles Phillips Russell, Corresponding Secretary. 
Edmund McDonald, Treasurer. 

The Young Men's Christian Association is a voluntary organization of 
the students in the University, and is entirely under their management. 
The Faculty are in sympathy with the Association, and render service 
whenever requested to do so. 

The object of the Association is to promote growth in grace and Chris- 
tian fellowship among its members and aggressive Christian work among 
the students. To this end three meetings are held every week. 

A vigorous movement is on foot to raise ten thousand dollars for a Y. M. 
C. A. building. 

About one hundred students are enrolled in the Bible classes taught by 
student members of the Association. During the present session, six 
Bible Courses have been given, as follows: — 

Messrs. McFadyen, Gordon, Barnhardt and Robertson. 

1. Life of Christ. 

A practical, comprehensive course, based on the life of Christ as 
presented in the four gospels, with special reference to the his- 
torical development and application of His teachings. 

Messrs. Judd and Stevens. 

2. Studies in the Acts and Epistles. 

With reference to the spread and development of the Christian 
Church, based on a careful study of the Acts of the Apostles and 
the Epistles of Paul. 



152 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Mr. Charles Boss. 

3. Old Testament Characters. 

Arranged for daily, personal study with reference to the lives an d 
work of the Old Testament heroes. 

Mr. Harper. 

4. Personal Workers. 

A daily study, systematically arranged, of God's method of train- 
ing personal workers both in the Old and New Testaments. 

Messrs. Ross and McDonald. 

5. Foreign Missions. 

A study of missionary heroes (fall term.) The principles and prob- 
lems of missions (spring term.) 

Professor Battle. 

6. New Testament Characters. 

Lectures on Sunday, in the University Chapel, 9 — 9:30 a. m. 

Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 are given on Sunday, 12:30 — 1:30 p. m. Course 
5 is given on Sunday night. 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTH COM- 
MENCEMENT (1902). 



JUNE 1, BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Reverend O. B. Brown, D.D. 

JUNE 3. 

The Alumni Address, by Hon. Edward W. Pou. 

The Debate by Representatives from the Dialectic and Philan- 
thropic Literary Societies. 

Dialectic Society. Philanthropic Society. 

Lester Leonidas Parker, Reuben Oscar Everett, 

Roach Sidney Stewart. Francis Sylvester Hassell. 

JUNE 4, COMMENCEMENT. 

SENIOR SPEAKING. 

Pinckney Broadfield Groonie, Robert Ransom Williams, 

Marvin Hendrix Stacy, Thaddeus Awasaw Adams. 

THE COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS. 

Hon. Hilary A. Herbert. 



154 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

DEGREES. 



Bachelor of Arts. 



Walter Monroe Brown, 

A.B., Elon College, 1899. 
Christiana Busbee, 
Ruins Benjamin Chastain, 
Joseph Blount Cheshire, Jr., 
Brent Skinner Drane, 
Richard Nixon Duffy, 
Julius Fletcher Duncan, 
Louis Graves, 
Eugene Price Gray, 
Quentin Gregory, 
Pinckney Broadfield Groonie, 



John Steele Henderson, Jr., 
Alonzo Commodore Kerley, 
Ivey Foreman Lewis. 
Robert Amsei Merritt. 
Frank Abton Lunsford Reid, 
Henry Blount Short, Jr., 
James Thomas Smith, 
William Faris Stafford, 
George Phifer Stevens, 
Reston Stephenson, 
Buxton Barker Williams, 
Robert Ransom Williams. 



Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Thaddeus Awasaw Adams, 
David Clark Ballard, 
Tod Robinson Brem, 
Minna Curtis Bynuna, 
Simon Justus Everett, 
Gardiner Marion Garren, 
Mary Groome, 
Robert Stuart Hutchison, 
Charles Andrews Jonas, 



James Harry Mclver, 
Warren Stebbins Prior, 
Birdie Pritchard, 

Ph.B., Elon College. 1901, 
Henry Moring Robins, 
Guy Vernon Roberts, 
Edward Duncan Sallenger, 
Marvin Hendrix Stacy, 
David Pony Stern, 



John Edward Swain. 



Bachelor of Science. 



Claude Oliver Abernethy, 
Charles Metcalfe Byrnes, 
Albert Marvin Carr, 
John Atkinson Ferrell, 
Robert Linn Godwin, 



Fred Henry Lemly. 
Robert Arthur Lichtenthaeler, 
Eugene Grissom Moss, 
Thomas Clifford Oliver, 
Thomas Clemson jWorth , 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 165 

Bachelor of Laws. 

John Frazier Glenn, Whitehead Kluttz, 

Edward Joseph Nelson. 

Graduate in Pharmacy. 
Benjamin Franklin Page. 

Master of Arts. 

Minna Curtis Bynum, Ph.B., 1902, 
^-Julius Fletcher Duncan, A.B., 1902, 

Jacob Warshaw, A.B., Harvard, 1900, 
^-Louis Round Wilson, A.B., 1899. 

Master of Science. 

tester Van Noy Branch, S.B., 1900. 

Clarence Albert Shore, S.B., 1900. 
^-John William Turrentine, Ph.B., 1901. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Greek: Christiana Busbee, Julius Fletcher Duncan, Robert Amsei 
Merritt, Helen Louise Odom, Buxton Barker Williams, Robert Ransom 
Williams. 

Latin: Minna Curtis Bynum, David Clark Ballard, Helen Louise Odom, 
James Thomas Smith, William Faris Stafford. 

French: Claude Oliver Abernethy, Louis Graves, Mary Groome, Henry 
Moring Robins. 

English: Mary Groome. 

History: Julius Fletcher Duncan, John Atkinson Ferrell, Guy Vernon 
Roberts, Edward Duncan Sallenger. 



156 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Physics: David Clark Ballard, Metrah Makely, Jr. 

Mathematics: Christiana Busbee, Richard Nixon Duffy, John Steele 
Henderson, Jr., Marvin Hendrix Stacy, George Phifer Stevens. 

Chemistry: Hugh Hammond Bennett, Fred Henry Lemly, Eugene 
Grissom Moss, John William Turrentine, Hubert Raymond Weller. 

Geology: George Chadbourn. 

Pedagogy: Gardiner Marion Garren, James Harry Mclver, Robert 
Amsei Merritt, Marvin Hendrix Stacy, John Edward Swain. 

Biology: Ivey Foreman Lewis. 

MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal: Rufus Clegg Morrow. 
The Hume Medal: Richard Nixon Duffy. 
The Hill Prize: John Atkinson Ferrell. 
The Harris Prize: Leone Burns Newell. 
The 'Greek Prize: Sidney Swaim Robins. 
The Worth Prize: Charles Metcalfe Byrnes. 
The Bradham Prize: Benjamin Franklin Page. 
The Early English Text Society Prize: Minna Curtis Bynum. 
The Bingham Prize: Lester Leonidas Parker, Roach Sidney Stewart, 
representing the Dialectic Society. 
The Mangum Medal: Marvin Hendrix Stacy. 



THE ASSOCIATION OF THE ALUMNI. 



THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION. 

Thomas S. Kenan, A.B., President. 
Henry A. London, A.B., Secretary. 

The membership includes all persons who have matriculated at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina in any department, except the Summer School, 
and all who are or have been officers of the institution. 

An effort is now being made to accomplish a more thorough organization 
of the Alumni. The desire is that the individual alumni shall form into 
Local Alumni Associations in every community. These Local Associations 
are to form by proportional representation the General Association of the 
Alumni . The next meeting of the General Association will be held in Ger- 
rard Hall at the University at the Commencement in June, 1903. Local 
Associations have been formed in certain cities and others will be estab- 
lished in the course of the year. It is hoped that every alumnus will con- 
cern himself in assisting the organization in his county or town. A printed 
statement of the plan of organization has been prepared and will be sup- 
plied on request. Inquiries should be directed to Mr. James C. Taylor, 
Secretary of the Alumni, Chapel Hill, N. C. 




SUMMAEY. 



Boards of Government and Instruction and Other Officers. 

Trustees, 78 

Professors, 32 

Instructors, 11 

Assistants, 23 

— 66 
Summer School Faculty, 23 

Other Officers, 10 

Students. 

The College: — 

Graduate Students, 
Senior Class, 
Junior Class, 
Sophomore Class, 
Freshman Class, 

The Law Department: — 
Students, Regular Session, 
Students, Summer Term, 

The Department op Medicine: — 

Fourth- Year Students, 4 

Third- Year Students, 2 

Second-Year Students, 36 

First- Year Students, 40 

Special Students, 1 

— 83 
The Department of Pharmacy: — 

Second- Year Students, 12 

First- Year Students, 31 

Special Students, 3 

— 46 
The Summer School, 90 

Whole number of students, 714 

Names inserted twice, 16 



25 




64 




59 




98 




156 






:02 


62 




31 




— 


93 



INDEX. 



Absences, 64. 

Examinations for excess of, 65. 
Act of Incorporation, 7. 
Administration, Officers of, 20. 
Admission of students not candidates for 
a degree, 27. 
"Women, 56. 
Requirements for, 23. 
to Advanced Standing, 26. 
the College, 23. 

Dept. of Pharmacy. 97, 

100. 
Law Department, 75. 
Graduate School, 54. 
Dept. of Medicine, 84, 

85, 89. 
School of Mining, 104. 
Aid, Pecuniary, 57. 
Alumni Association, The, 157. - 
Anatomy, Courses in, 82. 
Anglo-Saxon, Courses in, 38, 39. 
Assaying, Courses in, 102. 
Assignment of Rooms, 63. 
Athletics, 10, 68, 143. 

Eligibility to, 68- 
Attendance, 64. 

Medical, 11. 

upon Chapel, 11, 66. 

Bachelors 1 Degrees. See Degrees. 
Bible Study, Courses in, 151. 
Biological Laboratory, The, 146. 
Biology, Courses in, 49, 50, 81, 82, 95. 
Board. See Expenses. 
Botany, Courses in, 50, 95, 134. 

Calendar, 6. 

Candidacy for Advanced Degrees, 54. 

Certificates, Entrance, 23. 

in the College, 69, IDS. 
Law Department, 74. 
Summer School, 129. 
Chapel Exercises, 10, 66. 
Charter of the University, 7. 
Chemical Laboratory, The, 144. 
Chemistry, Courses in, 47, 81, 94, 102, 135. 
Children, Diseases of, 88. 
Christian Association, The, 151. 
City Free Dispensary, The, 89. 
College, The, 23. 

Admission, 23. 
Expenses, 60. 
Registration, 63. 
Scholarships, 58. 
Tear, 10. 
Commencement, 10, 69, 153. 
Committees, of the Trustees, 14. 
Faculty, 20. 
Conditions, Entrance, 26. 

Examinations for the Re- 
moval of, 67. 
Conduct, 11. 69. 



Contents, Table of, 3. 
Contracts for Rooms, 63. 
Courses, Changes in, 64. 

for Students not Candidates 
for a Degree, 31. 
Teachers, 31. 
Leading to Degrees, 28. 
Bachelor of Arts, 28. 
Laws, 74. 
Philosophy, 29. 
Science, 30. 
Doctor of Medicine, 80. 
Graduate in Pharmacy, 92. 
Culture, General, 11. 

Physical, 10, 143. 
Religious, 11. 
Damage to University Property, 61, 63. 
Deems Fund, The, 60. 
Deficiencies, Removal of, 66. 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 10, 25, 28, 154. 
Laws, 10, 74, 155. 
Philosophy, 10, 25, 29, 

154. 
Science. 10, 25. 30, 
154. 
Doctor of Medicine, 10, 89. 
Philosophy, 10, 55. 
Graduate in Pharmacy 10,98. 
Master of Arts, 10, 54, 155. 

Science, 10, 55, 155. 
Degrees, Conferred in 1902, 154. 
Courses leading to, 28. 
Honorary. 56- 
Dialectic Literarv Society, 143. 
Discipline, 11,69.' 
Diseases of Children, 88. 

the Ear, Nose and Throat, 88, 
Eye, 88. 
Dispensarv, The City Free, 89. 
Doctor of Medicine, 80 
Doctor of Philosophy, 10, 55. 
Donors to the Library, 141. 
Dormitory Accommodations, 61. 
Drawing, "Courses in, 134. 

Ear, Diseases of, 88. 
Economics, Courses in, 43. 
Education. See Pedagogy. 
Elegibility for Athletic Teams, 68. 

Fraternities, 68. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 149. 
English, Courses in, 38, 131. 
Prize in, 57, 58. 

Requirements for Admission, 
23. 
Entrance, Subjects accepted for, 23. 
Equipment, 9. 
Examinations, Absences from, 66. 

Conduct of, 66. 

Excuses from, 66. 

for Entrance, 25. 



160 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



Examinations for Excess of Absence, 65. 
Removal of Condi- 
tions, 66. 
Expenses, in College, 60. 

Dept. of Medicine, 85, 89. 
Pharmacy, 100. 
G-radnate School, 54. 
Law Dept. 75. 
School of Mining, 104. 
Summer School, 137. 
Expression, Courses in, 40, 131. 
Eye, Diseases of, 88. 

Faculty, College 15. 

Dept. of Medicine, 77, 78. 

Pharmacy, 91. 
Law Dept., 72. 
School of Mining, 101. 
Summer School, 128. 
Fees. See Expenses. 
Finance, Courses in, 43. 
Foundation, of the University, 7. 

Dept. of Medicine, 78. 
Pharmacy, 91.' 
Fraternities, 68. 
Free Tuition, 59. 
French, Courses, in 36, 136. 
for Admission, -24. 
Fund, The Deems, 60. 

General Hygiene, 88. 
Geography, Courses in, 133. 
Geology, Courses in, 51, 103, 133. 

Prize in, 57. 
German, Courses in, 35, 136. 
for Admission, 24. 
Literature, Courses in, 36. 
Germanic Philology, Courses in, 36. 
Government of the University, 7. 
Grades of Scholarship, 63. 
Graduate Students, 54. 

Admission 54. 
Degrees, 54. 
Graduation, 28, 68. 

Dept. of Medicine, 89. 

Pharmacy, 98. 
Law Dept., 74. 
Greek, Courses in, 32, 135. 
for Admission, 23. 
Prize, 57. 
Gymnasium, The, 143. 
Gynecology, Courses in, 87. 

Historical Society, The, 149. 
History, Courses in, 41, 132. 

for Admission, 24. 

Prize, 57. 
Holidays, 10. 
Hospitals, 9, 86, 89. 
Hygiene, 88, 134. 

Incorporation, Act of, 7. 
Infirmary, 9. 

Instruction, Courses of; See Greek, etc, 
Plan of, in Dept. of Medi- 
cine, 79. 
Italian, Courses in, 38. 
Journal Club in Chemistry, 49. 
Geology, 52. 

Kindergarten, Courses in, 135. 

Laboratory, Biological, 146. 
Chemical, 144. 
Geological, 147. 



Laboratory, Pharmaceutical, 97. 

Physical, 144. 
Latin, Courses m, 33, 136. 

For Admission, 23, 84. 
Law Department, The, 72. 

Admission, 75. 

Courses of Instruction, 72. 

Degree of LL.B., 74. 

Examinations, 73. 

Expenses, 75. 

Faculty, 72. 

Lectures, 74. 

Moot Court, 74. 

Registration, 75. 

Students, 118. 

Sumnier School, 75. 
Library, The, 140. 

Donors to, , 141. 
Literary Societies, 148. 
Loan Funds, 60. 
Location of the University, 8. 

Dept. of Medicine, 78, 85. 

Manual Training, 133. 
Master's Degrees. See Degrees. 
Materia Medica, Courses in, 83, 94. 
Mathematics, Courses in, 44, 101, 132. 
for Admission, 24, 84. 
Prize, 57- 
Medals, 57, 156. 
Medical Attendance, 11. 
Medicine, Courses in, 80, 86. 
Medicine, Dept. of, 77. 

Admission, 85, 89. 

Courses of Instruction, 
80,86. 

Degree, 89. 

Entrance, 84. 

Expenses, 85, 89. 

Faculty, 77. 

Foundation, 78. 

Location, 78, 85. 

Pecuniary Aid, 84. 

Plan of Instruction, 79. 

Registration, 85, 90. 

Students in, 122. 
Metallurgy, Courses in, 102. 
Mineralogy, Courses in, 51, 133. 
Mining, Courses in, 103. 
School of, 101. 

Admission, 104. 

Courses of Instruction, 
101. 

Expenses, 104. 

Facility, 101. 

Laboratories, 104. 

Registration, 105. 
Minor Surgery, Coui'ses in, 83. 
Modern Languages. See German, etc. 
Moot Court, The, 74. 
Museum, The Biological, 146. 
Geological, 147. 

Nose, Diseases of, 88. 

Nortli Carolina Historical Society, 149. 

Obstetrics, Courses.in, 87. 
Officers of Administration, 20. 
Operative Pharmacy, 93. 
Orations for Graduation, 69, 153. 

Prize for, 59. 
Organizations of the University, 148. 
Dialectic Society, 148. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 



161 



Organizatiens of the University, 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific 

Society, 149. 
North Carolina Historical 

Society, 149. 
Philantliropic Society, 148 
Philological Club, 150. 
Shakspere Club, 150. 
Young Men's Christian 
Association, 151. 
Pathology, Courses in, 83. 
Pecuniary Aid, in College, 57. 

Dept. of Medicine, 84. 
Pedagogy, Courses in, 52. 130. 
Pharmacy, Courses in, 84, 93. 
Dept. of, 91. 

Admission, 100. 
Courses of Instruction, 

93. 
Examinations, 97. 
Expenses, 100. 
Faculty, 91. 
Foundation, 91. 
Optional Courses, 96. 
Prizes, 99. 
Quizzes, 97. 
Registration, 100. 
Requirements for Grad- 
uation, 98. 
Students, 124. 
Theses, 99. 
Philosophy, Courses in, 41. 

Prize, 58. 
Physical Culture, 10, 143. 
Physical Laboratory, The, 144. 
Physics, Courses in, 45, 80, 94, 102, 133. 

for Admission, 25. 
Physiology, Courses in, 82, 95, 134. 
Political Economy, 43. 
Science,' 43. 

Prize in, 58. 
Prescription Filling. 95. 
Primary Instruction, Courses in, 129, 135. 
Prizes. 57, 84, 99, 156. 
Quizzes, 97. 
Registration, in College, 63. 

Dept. of Medicine, 85, 90. 
Pharmacy, 100. 
Law Dept., 75. 
School of Mining, 105. 
Regulations Regarding Students, 63. 
Religious Culture 10. 
Requirements for Admission, 
into College, 23. 

Dept. of Medicine, 84. 

Pharmacy, 97. 
School of Mining, 104. 
Requirements for Graduation, 28, 68. 
in Dept. of Medicine, 89. 



Requirements for Graduation in De- 
partment of Pharmacy, 98. 
Law Dept., 74. 
Romanic Languages, Courses in, 36. 
Rooms, Assignment of, 63. 

Schedule of Examinations, 71. 

for excess of Absences, 65. 
Removal of Conditions, 67. 
Schedule of Recitations, 70. 
Scholarships, 58, 84. 
Shakspere Club, The, 150. 
Societies. See Organizations. 
Sloyd, Courses in, 134. 
Spanish, Courses in, 37. 
Speakers at Commencement, 69, 153. 
Standing, 63. 

Students not Candidates for a Degree, 
27, 31. 

College, 106. 

Graduate, 10, 54, 106. 

Law, 118. 

Medicine, 122. 

Pharmacy, 124. 

Summer School. 137. 
Studies, Elective, 28. 

Required, 28. 
Summary, 127, 158 

by States, 127. 
Summer School, 128. 

Courses of Instruction, 130. 

Expenses, 137. 

Faculty, 128. 

Plan of Instruction in, 129. 

Students, 137. 

of Law, 75. 
Surgery, Courses in, 83, 87. 

Theses, Dept. of Pharmacy, 99. 
for Graduation, 69. 
Times of Presentation, 69. 
Throat, Diseases of, 88. 
Toxicology, Courses in, 81, 83, 94. 
Trustees, 12. 
Tuition Fee, in College, 60. 

Dept. of Medicine, 85, 89. 
Pharmacy, 100. 
Graduate School, 55. " 
Law Dept., 75. 
School of Mining, 104. 
Summer School, 137. 
Tuition, Free, 59, 137. 

University, The, 7. 

Library, 140. 

Organizations. See Organi- 
tions. 

Year, The College, 10. 

Young Men's Christian Association, 151. 






cAnnouncements 



THE Fall -Term of the University of 
North Carolina will beg-in Sep- 
tember 7th, 1903; the Spring- Term, 
January 2nd, 1904. There is a recess 
of about ten days at Christmas. Com- 
mencement will be on June 3, 1903. 

2. Applicants for admission into the 
University will be examined Septem- 
ber 7th, 8th and 9th, 1903. They 
should reach Chapel Hill one or more 
days before the examination period. 

3. Lectures in the Academic and in 
the Professional Schools will begin 
September 10th, 1903. 

4. For the Catalog-ue or for detailed 
information, address 



F. P. VENABLE, Pkesidknt 

University of Nokth Carolina 
Chapel Hill